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Dr No (1962) Wikipedia - Dr No

Dr No (1962) Lobby card yellow background
Dr No (1962) lobby card

 

 

 

Scene: James Bond spends an evening at Les Ambassadeurs
Location: Pinewood Studios

 

Sean Connery as James Bond utters the immortal lines in the scene at Les Ambassadeurs in Dr No (1962)
»Bond ... James Bond....«
Sean Connery wears evening dress by tailor Anthony Sinclair while he utters the most famous line in motion picture history.

 

Sean Connery as James Bond on the set of Les Ambassadeurs at Pinewood Studios

 

 

Steven Ruben in The James Bond Films page 20 relates how Young and Connery put together those the most important few seconds in motion picture history:


His camera faces Sean Connery's back until the precisely worked out moment when Sylvia Trench addresses him, and he is seen for the first time lighting his cigarette and announcing himself as "Bond ... James Bond.".
    It worked well on paper but when the time came to shoot the sequence, something went wrong. When Connery put the cigarette to his lips, flicked the gunmetal lighter and then intoned, "Bond ... James Bond," Young, could not help seeing a certain humour in the moment. LIGHTER ... FLICK ... NAME...It had a comical edge to it, almost as if the flame in the lighter was spotlighting the moment and Young wanted nothing of the sort. It was Connery who suggested a solution. He would hold the cigarette on his lips, flick the lighter and then wait a beat before he threw out his name to Sylvia. The first shot of Bond would hold on that last beat, after the lighter had operated. Connery would appear in the cloud of cigarette smoke, uttering his name, with no distraction. Twenty minutes later, the scene played beautifully and was no longer funny.


 

Dr No - Les Ambassadeurs, London
Les Ambassadeurs Club Wikipedia -   Link - Les Ambassadeurs, Hamilton Place off Park Lane Wikipedia - Park Lane, Mayfair, London, England.

 

Les Ambassadeurs - Le Cercle
Le Cercle

Le Cercle Gastronomique et des Jeux de Hasard or Le Cercle was the name Ian Fleming used to refer to his inner circle of gambling buddies which may be the reason that the name was used here.

 

The Life of Ian Fleming by John Pearson published by Jonathan Cape, 1967:


The Cercle, or to give it the full Fleming title, Le Cercle gastronomique et des jeux de hasard, was, like his house, another expression of the odd way of life Ian Fleming worked out for himself as a young man in his late twenties. The members were a well-to-do gang of youngish Old Etonians-about-Town and the purpose of the society or club was to allow them to dine well two or three times a month, indulge in a little bridge at half-a-crown a hundred, and spend their week-ends playing golf together. But when Fleming founded the Cercle with his friend Gerald Coke, half the fun of it for him lay in building an elaborate myth around these very ordinary activities.
   Coke, an amiable and rather conventional young man, simply wanted to gather together a few friends, but this was not enough for Fleming and it all had to be turned into a carefully ordered ritual. He took a lot of trouble finding a suitable name for the club and the one he finally chose emphasized its gastronomic side: members must start improving their palates by enjoying a very special menu whenever they dined.
   At the Tennerhof at Kitzbhel Phyllis Bottome had invented an imaginary dining-club, and Fleming had been particularly good at suggesting exotic meals for it. With the Cercle there was more than an echo of those youthful fantasies.
   Boredom was always his great enemy, but with a little imagination the most drab situation could be given a shining veneer of excitement. Before members of the Cercle dined at Ebury Street he would spend hours discussing the ideal menu, but all too frequently these meals turned out to be Barmecide feasts, perhaps because Fleming was never really interested in food and wine it was the idea of the perfect meal that excited him. I always used to tell Ian, says Coke, that what he really liked to eat was uf la coq and a good slice of chocolate cake.
   To golf and bridge his attitude seems to have been somewhat similar. He was not a sophisticated player of either game: what he wanted was simple schoolboy excitement and he pursued it with insatiable energy. His bridge, says Coke, was erratic and unconventional. He could play well but he would always take too many risks to be a really reliable partner.


 

 

 

Dr No (1962) Les Ambassadeurs: Bond's Dunhill black oxidized cigarette case and cigarette lighter
00:07:29 Bond's cigarette case and cigarette lighter rest on the green baize beside his right hand.

 

Dr No (1962) Les Ambassadeurs: Bond's Dunhill black oxidized cigarette case and cigarette lighter
00:07:40 The push-button catch for the cigarette case is visible.

 

Dr No (1962) Les Ambassadeurs: Bond's Dunhill black oxidized cigarette case and cigarette lighter
00:07:40 The cigarettes inside the case are visible.

 

Dr No (1962) Les Ambassadeurs: Bond's Dunhill black oxidized cigarette case and cigarette lighter
00:07:41 Bond picks up his cigarette case and begins to open it. The profile of the case is visible.

 

Dr No (1962) Les Ambassadeurs: Bond's Dunhill black oxidized cigarette case and cigarette lighter
00:07:41 The cigarette case begins to open

 

Dr No (1962) Les Ambassadeurs: Bond's Dunhill black oxidized cigarette case and cigarette lighter
00:07:42 The cigarette case is fully open and you can see the piece of elastic which holds the cigarettes in place.

 

Dr No (1962) 00:07:42 A comparison of the cigarettes in Bond's cigarette case with a Senior Service cigarettes
A comparison of the cigarettes in Bond's cigarette case with a Senior Service cigarettes (right of photograph)

 

Bond's Dunhill black oxidized cigarette case and cigarette lighter showing it at rest on the baise with his Ronson lighter and in Bond's hands
Bond's Dunhill black oxidized cigarette case and cigarette lighter showing it at rest on the baise with his Ronson lighter and in Bond's hands

From Ian Fleming Miscellany by Andrew Cook, published by the History Press, 2015, Cook relates that it was Maud Russell whom gave to Ian Fleming a gold cigarette case which had a black gunmetal finish which he carried for the rest of his life:


   Anne was resident mostly at the Dorchester, where Ian often played bridge with her and her lifelong friend Loelia Duchess of Westminster. The Duchess, who was separated from the Duke, had a crush on Ian that does not seem to have been reciprocated. She was six years older than him and had been a ‘bright young thing’ in the 1920s. He never could take her seriously as a seductive older woman, but he did immortalise her as the matronly Loelia Ponsonby in the Bond books. It was Maud Russell for whom he had real respect and affection, and it seems to have been mutual. She gave him a keepsake that he treasured: a gold cigarette case, disguised by a coating of gunmetal. She understood his love of deceit.


 

 

 

 

Les Ambassadeurs, London, England
Les Ambassadeurs Club Wikipedia -   Link - Les Ambassadeurs , Hamilton Place off Park Lane Wikipedia - Park Lane , Mayfair Wikipedia - , London, England

 

Old Park Lane: Les Ambassadeurs and the Royal Aeronautical Club
Hamilton Place, looking south to Les Ambassadeurs and the Royal Aeronautical Club. The actual gambling tables are in the low building the roofs of which appear just above the high wall. The restaurant is the line of windows on the first floor (US: second floor) which overlook the roofs

Old Park Lane runs behind Les Ambassadeurs and the Royal Aeronautical Club. Old Park Lane is called Old Park Lane because originally Park Lane was a two-lane road which ran the Eastern margin of Hyde Park, which is how it was when the Bentley Boys used it as a race-track. New Park Lane, the six lane divided highway which exists now was constructed by building over the Eastern margin of Hyde Park. At the Southern end, where the camera is situated, there were buildings on the West side the old Park Lane which meant it could not be widened, and so a diversion was built behind the buildings through Hyde Park, and several buildings east of Aspley House, which faced Piccadilly/Duke of Wellington Place were demolished, which left Aspley House as an island in Hyde Park.

 

London Hamilton Place western side; Les Ambassadeurs, showing the Royal Aeronautical Club to the left
Hamilton Place western side: Les Ambassadeurs, showing the Royal Aeronautical Club to the left. As well as being a good club the Royal Aeronautical Club will host private dinner-dances if you are looking for a venue for a special occasion.

 

Les Ambassadeurs

 

 

It is with regret that I do not recommend membership of Les Ambassadeurs. I received a letter from the management which indicated that after a dispute with the front desk, the front desk had quite obviously lied to the management. As a result myself and a friend resigned our memberships. Remember that this was a dispute with the front desk, not with the club or its management.

 

 

Scene: Bond is called into M's office and the armourer Major Boothroyd is summoned.
Location: Pinewood Studios

- Note that as Bond walks through the leather double doors into M's office, on the right of frame is a bronze bust of Sir Winston Churchill. If you wish for your own then the office at Chartwell Wikipedia - Link - have them for sale, in a similar size to the one in M's office. Before the Great War Winston Churchill served in the same unit as Fleming's father Valentine where they became close friends. During the Great War Churchill served on the Western Front for some months, back with his old unit and his friend Valentine. When Valentine was killed, it was Winston Churchill who wrote his obituary. The destruction of the Great War was of astronomical proportions and far greater than the Second World War.

In Winston S. Churchill Volume IV 1916-1922 by Martin Gilbert, published by Heinemann , London, 1975, page 911


   Churchill was deeply affected by the recurring tragedies of the war. Since August 1914 the death of his friends in action had been a source of much personal sorrow and sombre reflection. On 22 March 1917 he wrote to Archibald Sinclair: 'The war weighs heavy on us all & amid such universal misfortune & with death so ubiquitous and life so harsh, I find difficulty in setting pen to paper,' and on 10 May 1917 he begged the House of Commmons, then in secret session, not to tolerate 'fresh, bloody, and disastrous adventures,' on the western front. Ten days later his friend Valentine Fleming was killed in action: Churchill wrote his obituary in The Times on May 25, Four days later he wrote to his wife, from France: 'Never for a moment dos the thought of this carnage & ruin escape my mind....'.


 

Frame from the documentary, a studio still M's desk shows an envelope bearing the imprint In His Majesty's Service
Studio still: In the office of M, his desk displays envelopes printed with 'On His Majesty's Service'

 

- On M's desk you can see an official government envelope in the envelope holder.

Official British Goverment Envelope
An official British Government envelope from the late 1970s, bearing the text "On Her Majesty's Service". This means that it does not require a stamp because it is being sent on official government business. It is this phrase which inspired the title of Fleming's novel On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1963). Of course, no communication used by the secret intelligence services would go by regular mail. They would be sent by diplomatic courier.

- At this time, diplomatic mail between embassies went via diplomatic courier in the diplomatic pouch. From Royal Navy vessels, mail was placed in a canvas bag and handed in to the embassy. The canvas bag was about thirty cm wide and sixty cm tall and was probably one of the small canvas dunnage bags which were standard issue to crew. It bore an ink imprint of the 'Crown' and underneath three large letters 'HBM' for 'Her Brittanic Majesty's' thence underneath that was the word 'DIPLOMATIC MAIL'. I have only seen one of these once. Even in the age of steel ships the navy used a lot of heavy canvas ('00' Cotton Duck Wikipedia - Link - Cotton Duck). Their hammocks were canvas and so were their dunnage Wikipedia - DunnageLink - Dunnage bags.

- Note that when M is to light his pipe and finds that he has run out of matches, Bond whips out his black oxidised Ronson cigarette lighter.

Dr No (1962) 00:11:31 Bond profer's M his Ronson cigarette lighter when M runs out of matches
00:11:31 M finds out he is out of matches when he tries to light his pipe and Bond profers M his Ronson cigarette lighter

 

 

- M states that he will hand to Bond some briefing papers for the flight "in a self-destructor bag". The company which manufactured the red leather briefcases used by government ministers, Barrow, Hepburn & Gale, used to manufacture a version of the case which was weighted with lead so that it would sink if thrown overboard. While this was useful in the days of the Empire routes from the northern Mediterranean ports via Suez, by the 1960s the jet-age meant that government ministers were far more likely to travel by jet air-liner, which would limit the usefulness of a lead-lined briefcase. Sometime in the early 1960s Markus Wolf, Cold War chief of the East German Stasi (HVA), told of a journey to Cuba on the Soviet long-range shuttle flight, Moscow-Berlin-Cuba. The flight landed without incident, but a glance out of the window showed that they had landed somewhere on the Unites States mainland. Infrequently, adverse weather conditions would mean that the flight had to come down short on the United States mainland. The flight route from Berlin to Cuba 'cuts across' the top of the globe, rather than flying along the line of latitude. When the route 'cuts across' the top of the globe, it describes the shortest line across the globe, and route takes the aircraft across the ice bound reaches of the North Atlantic and down the coast of Canada, thence, the United States. Behind Wolf's seat there were two Chinese Communist officials travelling to Cuba and Wolf reported that a clearly anxious conversation in Chinese broke out behind him. After a tense pause, the two Chinese started to eat the papers from their diplomatic bag. After around half an hour of this the two men were clearly struggling to consume and digest any more paper. Wolf nearly offered to help but was saved by the departure of the aircraft to resume its flight to Cuba.

- Graham Greene tells in Our Man in Havana that the MI6 office in Havana used to store its files inter-leaved with sheets of Nitrate film Wikipedia - Nitrate film . Nitrate film when touched with a match will conflagrate rapidly and with much output of heat. The reaction produces oxygen thus it will continue to burn even when under water. Large quantities of papers could be destroyed in seconds with the touch of a match. Nitrate film is unstable over several decades and will self-combust on exposure to air. This makes opening archive film canisters hazardous. Much WWII gun-camera footage was shot on Nitrate film and while stable in the Sixties when I used to review it by the late 1980s it was becoming hazardous.

- The nature of the self-destructor bag mentioned by M is not expanded upon but my guess would be that it involved the use of Nitrate film to destroy its contents.

- In these times attempting to board an aircraft bound for the United States while carrying a Walther PPK and a lead-lined briefcase containing Nitrate film will end up with you spending most of the next millennia in GITMO.

 

 

 

 

+ THE ARMAMENT OF BOND


+ PISTOL
- Fleming's Specification
- - Beretta
- - - Beretta 418
- - - Beretta M1934
- Boothroyd's Specification
- - Walther PPK
- - Smith & Wesson Centennial
- Terminal Ballistics
- Silencer

+ HOLSTER
- Fleming's Holster
- Boothroyd's Holster
- The Berns-Martin Lightnin holster

+ DRAWSTROKE
+ Drawstroke
- Fleming's Drawstroke
- Boothroyd's Drawstroke
- EON's Drawstroke
+ SCREEN
- EON's Specification
- - Beretta M1934
- - Walther PP
- EON's Holster

 

 

 

- In Fleming's first James Bond novel Casino Royale (1953) page 47.9 (Pan edition) Fleming describes Bond using a very flat .25 Beretta automatic with a skeleton grip. Fleming does not mention the model of Beretta but he does mention the caliber.


   With the thin vertical scar down his right cheek the general effect was faintly piratical. Not much of Hoagy Carmichael there, thought Bond, as he filled a flat, light gunmetal box with fifty of the Morland cigarettes with the triple gold band. Mathis had told him of the girl's comment.
He slipped the case into his hip pocket and snapped his oxidized Ronson Wikipedia - Ronson to see if it needed fuel. After pocketing the thin sheaf of ten-mille notes, he opened a drawer and took out a light chamois leather holster and slipped it over his left shoulder so that it hung about three inches below his arm-pit. He then took from under his shirts in another drawer a very flat .25 Beretta automatic with a skeleton grip, extracted the clip and the single round in the barrel and whipped the action to and fro several times, finally pulling the trigger on the empty chamber. He charged the weapon again, loaded it, put up the safety catch and dropped it into the shallow pouch of the shoulder-holster. He looked carefully round the room to see if anything had been forgotten and slipped his single-breasted dinner-jacket coat over his heavy silk evening shirt. He felt cool and comfortable. He verified in the mirror that there was absolutely no sign of the flat gun under his left arm, gave a final pull at his narrow tie and walked out of the door and locked it.


 

In The Life of Ian Fleming by John Pearson published by Jonathan Cape, 1967, Pearson narrates how Fleming would write the draft of the novel without stopping then refer to experts to deal with the details:


   It was not only outside support which called for his attention. There were still numerous small points in the book that needed vetting or expanding, and it was now that he began the process, which became almost a matter of routine with his later books, of drawing on his various contacts to check his facts.
   It was interesting that his method never really changed; from the very beginning he relied on writing the entire book at full speed and then going over it later to fill in the details. It is also interesting to see just how shaky the expertise of this apparent master of certain kinds of expertise really is. For example, despite James Bond's apparent familiarity with all the byways of ballistics, Fleming's own knowledge of firearms was really very slight. He was a good shot and could admire guns for their workmanship and for what they symbolized, but he could never take the trouble to become an expert.
   There is surprising proof of this in a letter he wrote to Robert Churchill the gunsmith at the end of August, asking him to check over the names of the four different firearms mentioned in Casino Royale. Only one of them, the .38 Colt Police Positive (the gun that General Donovan gave him during the war for 'special services'), did he succeed in naming correctly. The other three were incorrect, and the personal weapon he had given to Bond was not only spelt wrongly but had the calibre wrong as well. He admitted his doubt quite cheerfully in his letter to Mr Churchill:
   The gun I have most serious doubts over is the .28 Biretta. In the book this is supposed to be a very light and flat automatic pistol. If you do not know the weapon I mean, or if, as is quite possible, it does not exist, it would be very kind if you would pencil in the most exotic-sounding weapon of about this calibre to be carried unobtrusively in a shoulder holster.
   Churchill the expert soon put him right, briskly informing him that the gun was a Beretta, not a Biretta, and that its calibre was .25, not .28.
   Although later on Fleming was to appear to make something of a cult about the arcane information he introduced into his books, he knew perfectly well that it was little more than a device for conveying credibility and carrying his readers with him. In essence he used facts like these in his books in exactly the same way as he used them time and again in conversation with his friends. Thus he always showed a predilection for quoting a line of Rilke in the original or for describing the mechanism of a blow-fish's reproductive system or an Hispano-Suiza gearbox. But when it comes to it, it is hard to think of a single subject on which he was a genuine expert. His knowledge of food was erratic, of wine almost non-existent. He was a sound driver, but he relied on the advice of experts like Aubrey Forshaw, head of Pan Books, for the really detailed facts of automobile technology in his books. It was the same with weaponry, the same with high finance, the same with gambling, the same even with the Secret Service. Only on matters of sex did he rely entirely on his own carefully guarded expertise.


 

- - (1) That Fleming was only vaguely aware of the existence of the Beretta pistol: "as is quite possible, it does not exist" .

- - (2) That Fleming was only vaguely aware of .25 Auto cartridge: ".28 Biretta" .

- - (3) That Fleming knew of the importance of concealability in Bond's choice of firearm "very light and flat automatic pistol" and was familiar with ways of achieving this. This aspect is the most important element of the equation.

- - (4) That Fleming intended Bond to carry the most concealable pistol possible.

- - (5) That Fleming was unaware of the different types of this kind of Beretta pistol.

- - (6) Robert Churchill may have just corrected both of Flemings errors, correcting 'Biretta' to 'Beretta' and '.28' to '.25 Auto'. Robert Churchill did not specify a model of Beretta in his letter. He may not have been familiar with that range of pistols or he may have thought that his function was to correct Fleming's mistakes rather than offer advice or information.

- - (7) I conclude that given the two facts, the only gun which Bond could have carried was the Beretta 418 Wikipedia - Beretta 418 . However Fleming does not mention the Beretta 418 Wikipedia - Beretta 418 by name despite mentioning all other pistols by full name. I am almost certain that if Robert Churchill or anyone else had mentioned the specific model of Beretta to him, the Beretta 418 Wikipedia - Beretta 418 , then Fleming would have used that name. He did not.

- - (8) I conclude that Ian Fleming was not aware of the different types of Beretta

- - (9) I conclude that Robert Churchill may have known but did not mention the model '418' if he did know of it. Otherwise Fleming would have used the full name 'Beretta 418' as he does for all his other firearms.

In the 1951 or 1952 Fleming wrote to his friend Ivar Bryce, who, being married to an American heiress, made the trans-Atlantic crossing four times a year on one of the RMS Queen Mary or RMS Queen Elizabeth. He asked Bryce 'Could you execute one chore for me? I badly need a .25 Beretta automatic and I can't find one in London. Could you pray purchase one in New York and bring it over in your left armpit?'.

- (1) It seems likely that Fleming had written this letter after his correspondence with Robert Churchill, because Fleming mentions '.25 Auto' not '.28 Auto'.

- (2) Fleming cannot find a Beretta in England and certainly not one in .25 Auto.

It seems likely that Fleming required the pistol in order to be able to describe it in more detail.

Fleming himself had carried a Browning .25 Auto throughout WWII: From The Life of Ian Fleming by John Pearson published by Jonathan Cape, 1967:


   Back on the last day of 1953 Fleming had written to the Assistant Commissioner asking a small favour. He owned three guns and had suddenly realized that none of them was properly licensed. They were a twelve-bore shotgun which was kept permanently with Holland and Holland the gunsmiths, the Colt .38 given to him by General Donovan ‘for certain services I rendered his Office of Strategic Studies [sic] during the war’, and a Browning .25 ‘issued during the war to protect John Godfrey’s life and my own. I take it with me each year to Jamaica,’ Fleming added, echoing his mother, ‘for defence against the Blackamoors.’ He told his correspondent that he knew that theoretically he had been breaking the law by failing to get his guns properly licensed, but honestly it had always slipped his memory – could Ronnie Howe ‘tidy up the situation, please’? Obligingly the Assistant Commissioner did so, and as a slight return and modest investment Fleming put Howe into his next book as Superintendent Ronnie Vallance.


 

 

 

Getty Images: Robert Churchill gunmaker inspects a bullet in a microscope
Robert Churchill Wikipedia - , gunmaker, inspects a bullet in a microscope.

 

E J Churchill, gunmakers, Orange Street Gunworks, Leicester Square, London - advertisement laid out in Gill Sans typeface
Robert Churchill is not to be confused with Best London gunmakers, Churchill Wikipedia - Link - London gunmakers E.J.Churchill

In WWII the Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 was widely issued to officers in the Wehrmacht and Italian Army. After 1944-JUN these side-arms would be looted whenever Wehrmacht troops surrendered to Allied troops which meant they would be in wide circulation as 'trade goods' for soldiers who were desirous of other items. Fleming may have seen or handled some of these Berettas. The M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 is, at a conservative guess, fifty times more numerous in circulation than the Beretta 418 Wikipedia - Beretta 418 .

- It is likely a Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 which Reinhard Heydrich returned fire on his assassins in Prag.

- (The M1935 is an M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 which fires .32ACP)

The only published source on firearms when Fleming wrote Casino Royale (1953) was the original edition of Small Arms of the World by H.B.Smith published by Military Service Publishing, 1943. This has an entry for the Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 but no other Berettas in that line nor did it have any entry for the Walther PP or Walther PPK. In a print publication where you are always short of space, the other members of the Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 family which preceded it would not merit a mention because they are too similar to merit their own page. Furthermore, examples of them would have been comparatively rare.

James Bond Bedside Companion by Raymond Benson page 65:


   Bond takes care to clean his weapons regularly, always making sure each part is in working order. In the first five novels, Bond's standard equipment consisted of a very flat .25 Beretta automatic with a skeleton grip inside a light chamois leather holster slipped over his left shoulder so that it hung about three inches below his armpit. But Major Boothroyd and M put a stop to Bond's use of the Beretta after it snagged in Bond's jacket during an attempted draw in From Russia with Love. In Dr No Boothroyd calls the Beretta a "ladies' gun" much to Bond's dismay. M's orders are final and Bond is forced to continue the series with a Walther PPK 7.65mm. The Walther is carried in a Berns-Martin triple-draw holster made of stiff saddle leather. For a longer range, Bond is issued with a Smith & Wesson Centennial Airweight. The .38 caliber revolver is hammerless, so it will not catch on clothing.


Benson continues:


   Beretta .25: Bond used this gun in Ian Fleming's first five novels. It had a blue finish, a 2" barrel and is 4.75" over-all. To the best of our knowledge, the "Jetfire" model was used. A silencer was also used twice with the gun.


Benson makes a suggestion that the 'Beretta' referred to by Fleming is the Beretta Jetfire (Beretta 950) Wikipedia - Beretta Jetfire Beretta 950. The Beretta Jetfire was only introduced in 1952, which would have been at the time of writing of Casino Royale (1953). Thus it is unlikely Fleming had ever seen one or had one in mind, for this reason

I CONCLUDE THAT the question we are addressing in the first five of Fleming's novels is what Bond's 'Beretta' would have to have been if it was in .25 Auto. Not what it was. Fleming does not define what it was and it is probable, judging from his correspondence, that he did not know of the different types of Beretta pistol in this line and had not conceived of an individual model.

The question we are addressing in the first five of Fleming's novels is 'what would the Beretta have have been to meet Fleming's description ?' and not 'what did Fleming intend the Beretta to have been ?' . The actul model of Beretta was undefined by Fleming. What the pistol would have to have been is a Beretta 418 or less likely a Beretta Jetfire (Beretta 950) Wikipedia - Beretta Jetfire Beretta 950.

+ THE BERETTA 418

Beretta 418: Beretta factory exploded parts diagram - Italian language
Beretta 418: Factory parts diagram

 

Beretta 418 advertizement
Beretta 418 Wikipedia - Beretta 418

Cartridges of the World by Frank C. Barnes 3rd Edition published by DBI Books, 1976, first published 1965  page 149 section 25 auto 635 auto
Cartridges of the World by Frank C. Barnes 3rd Edition published by DBI Books, 1976, first published 1965 , page 149 (section)

- In production from the 1930s to the early 1960s. Wartime production numbers about 35,000.

- 25 AUTO: Remember that when you receive a puncture wound to the heart or aorta, you die. It did not matter that it was a small wound and it did not matter how fast it was made. You still die. In this respect. 25 Auto or indeed any bullet which will reach the heart, will kill you. If the bullet hits a non-vital area of the torso, such as the gut, it does not matter how large the bullet was, nor how fast it was moving. The recipient will still be in the fight and still be returning fire. He could still kill you. Cartridges go as large or larger than a 4 bore elephant gun, which fire a bullet which is .935 of an inch in diameter and with flat cylindrical end. That will make a big wound track but it will not kill or incapacitate you if it strikes you in a non-vital area of your torso. However, being struck by an inch diameter flat-ended cylinder in the heart or aorta will give you only a second or two to live.

- Frank C. Barnes mentions that the power of the .22 Short Rimfire cartridge is superior to the .25 Auto. .22 Short is the short version of .22LR, a cartridge used only for shooting small vermin in situations where the backstop needs to be undamaged. This is a deeply uncomplimentary comparison which shows you how ineffective the .25 Auto cartridge is. The case capacity of the .25 Auto is slightly larger than .22 Short and therefore in theory can be loaded with more powder. However, it sounds like the factory loadings were not.

- - In classic 19thC dramas a victim was often saved from a gunshot by their cigarette case and you can see why if their assailant was using one their 'vest pocket pistol' cartridges because a steel cigarette case would easily stop the bullet. This event did happen once or twice in real life and Stanford Tuck, the RAF fighter pilot ace survived one of his many near-misses when the incoming bullet struck his cigarette case. A steel cigarette case will stop a bullet better than a gold cigarette case, and a depleted uranium cigarette case will stop a bullet more effectively than a steel one. While a gold cigarette case will impress plenty of people and require no introduction, the man with a depleted uranium metal cigarette case will win any bragging contest.

 

 

+ THE BERETTA M1934

- Last available from the factory in 1958

 

Small Arms of the World by H.B.Smith published by Military Service Publishing, 1943, page 110, Beretta M1934
Small Arms of the World by H.B.Smith published by Military Service Publishing, 1943, page 110, Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 . There is no entry in this edition for the Walther PP Wikipedia - Walther PP or Walther PPK.

 

Small Arms of the World published by Stackpole Books, Harrisburg, PA 1977,  11th revised edition
Small Arms of the World published by Stackpole Books, Harrisburg, PA, 1977, 11th revised edition, page 378 (section), Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934

 

Small Arms of the World published by Stackpole Books, Harrisburg, PA 1977,  11th revised edition
Small Arms of the World published by Stackpole Books, Harrisburg, PA, 1977, 11th revised edition, page 379, Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934

 

Jane's Infantry Weapons 1982-1983
Jane's Infantry Weapons 1982-1983 , (first published 1975), page 38, (section) Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934

 

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Beretta - Modello 1915
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Modello 1915/19 Modello 1923 Modello 1931 Modello 1934 M1934
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Beretta - Model 915 sectioned drawings
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Beretta - Model 1915/19
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Beretta - Modello 1923 with shoulder stock
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Beretta - Modello 1923 with shoulder stock
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Beretta factory during WWII aerial photograph
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Beretta Modello M1934 built 1938, year XVI of the Fascist era RE marking Regio Escerito, Royal Army - Beretta M1935 7.65mm built 1944
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Beretta Modello M1934 sectioned drawing
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Beretta Modello M1934 sectioned drawing
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Beretta Modello M1934 sectioned drawing exploded parts diagram
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991

 

Guns & Ammo Classic Test: Beretta M1934
Guns & Ammo 2002 Classic Test: Beretta M1934

- Note that the author mentions how reliable is the Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 .

Guns & Ammo Classic Test: Beretta M1934

Guns & Ammo Classic Test: Beretta M1934

Guns & Ammo Classic Test: Beretta M1934

 

Beretta M1934 exploded parts diagram

 

Beretta M1934 in original box NIB
Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 in original factory box

 

Cartridges of the World by Frank C. Barnes 3rd Edition published by DBI Books, 1976, first published 1965  page 165 section 380 Automatic 9mm Corto
Cartridges of the World by Frank C. Barnes 3rd Edition published by DBI Books, 1976, first published 1965 , page 154, section .380 Automatic / 9mm Corto

 

Comparison of Beretta 418 and Beretta M1934
Comparison of Beretta 418 Wikipedia - Beretta 418 and Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 .

- The overall length of M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 is 152mm whereas the overall length of the Beretta 418 Wikipedia - Beretta 418 is 120mm. Around 40,000 Beretta 418 Wikipedia - Beretta 418 were produced but around a million Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 were manufactured.

- #

- We can see that with Fleming's keen focus on a concealable pistol "very light and flat automatic pistol", if Fleming had been aware of the different models of Beretta, it seems likely he would have chosen the Beretta 418 Wikipedia - Beretta 418 . Not only is it thinner than the already small Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 but Fleming in the narrative describing Bond's Beretta, specifies that the stocks (the panels at either side of the pistol magazine) have been removed and replaced with tape. The replacement of the stocks with tape is not an aesthetic modification and one Fleming, in a novel, could easily afford to overlook. It seems likely that Fleming had seen this type of modification in real life, and thus formed an association between that modification and those agents who would be going into the field. Remember that agents who were parachuted into occupied Europe, if captured, would be shot - or worse - as spies, as was the custom in war. This would produce a keen focus on concealability and not being discovered. Remember the scene in Alistair MacLean's novelisation of Where Eagles Dare (1968) where the incoming SOE agent, Heidi, has her underwear inspected because on previous occasions, SOE agents had worn English or American underwear. During the war, an SOE agent after a successful landing, was undertaking a railway journey. After some minutes a fellow passenger in the carriage compartment leaned across and quietly mentioned to him that he must change his shoes immediately, for new leather shoes had been unavailable in France since the start of the war. Travel in Nazi occupied Europe was difficult but the the great mixture of peoples and races which travelled all over Europe made it easy for agents to hide among the variety. Post 1945 this was not so once behind the Iron Curtain and the smallest give-away would make the agent visible to everyone he met. I doubt operations could be conducted by anyone except native nationals of that particular target country. Even then, in the immediate post-war years, most of the agents landed in the Baltic republics by submarine and MTB, as well as in Yugoslavia, were all given away by the Cambridge Spy Ring and were picked and executed by the Soviets within hours. Blunt alone was responsible for the deaths of at least forty British agents.

 

 

By the time we reach Fleming's fifth novel Dr No (1958), five years later, Bond is being relieved of his Beretta and is issued with a Walther PPK.

In Chapter II, the gun which would become the screen Bond's trademark makes its entrance: The Walther PPK:


   Bond shrugged his shoulders. "I don't agree. I've used the .25 Beretta for fifteen years. Never had a stoppage and I haven't missed with it yet. Not a bad record for a gun. It just happens that I'm used to it and I can point it straight. I've used bigger guns when I've had to - the .45 Colt with the long barrel, for instance. But for close-up work and concealment I like the Beretta." Bond paused. He felt he should give way somewhere. "I'd' agree about the silencer, sir. They're a nuisance. But sometimes you have to use them."
   "We've seen what happens when you do," said M drily. "And as for changing your gun, it's only a question of practice. You'll soon get the feel of a new one." M allowed a trace of sympathy to enter his voice. "Sorry, 007. But I've decided. Just stand up a moment. I want the Armourer to get a look at your build."
   Bond stood up and faced the other man. There was no warmth in the two pairs of eyes. Bond's showed irritation. Major Boothroyd's were indifferent, clinical. He walked round Bond. He said "Excuse me" and felt Bond's biceps and forearms. He came back in front of him and said, "Might I see your gun?"
   Bond's hand went slowly into his coat. He handed over the taped Beretta with the sawn barrel. Boothroyd examined the gun and weighed it in his hand. He put it down on the desk. "And your holster?"
   Bond took off his coat and slipped off the chamois leather holster and harness. He put his coat on again. With a glance at the lips of the holster, perhaps to see if they showed traces of snagging. Boothroyd tossed the holster down beside the gun with a motion that sneered. He looked across at M. "I think we can do better than this, sir." It was the sort of voice Bond's first expensive tailor had used.
   Bond sat down. He just stopped himself gazing rudely at the ceiling. Instead he looked impassively across at M.
   "Well, Armourer, what do you recommend?"
   Major Boothroyd put on the expert's voice. "As a matter of fact, sir," he said modestly, "I've just been testing most of the small automatics. Five thousand rounds each at twenty-five yards. Of all of them, I'd choose the Walther PPK 7.65 mm. It only came fourth after the Japanese M-14, the Russian Tokarev and the Sauer M-38. But I like its light trigger pull and the extension spur of the magazine gives a grip that should suit 007. It's a real stopping gun. Of course it's about a .32 calibre as compared with the Beretta's .25, but I wouldn't recommend anything lighter. And you can get ammunition for the Walther anywhere in the world. That gives it an edge on the Japanese and the Russian guns." M turned to Bond. "Any comments?"
   "It's a good gun, sir," Bond admitted. "Bit more bulky than the Beretta. How does the Armourer suggest I carry it?"
   "Berns Martin Triple-draw holster," said Major Boothroyd succinctly. "Best worn inside the trouser band to the left. But it's all right below the shoulder. Stiff saddle leather. Holds the gun in with a spring. Should make for a quicker draw than that," he gestured towards the desk. "Three-fifths of a second to hit a man at twenty feet would be about right."
   "That's settled then." M's voice was final. "And what about something bigger?"
   "There's only one gun for that, sir," said Major Boothroyd stolidly. "Smith & Wesson Centennial Airweight. Revolver. •38 calibre. Hammerless, so it won't catch in clothing. Overall length of six and a half inches and it only weighs thirteen ounces. To keep down the weight, the cylinder holds only five cartridges. But by the time they're gone," Major Boothroyd allowed himself a wintry smile, "somebody's been killed. Fires the -38 S & W Special. Very accurate cartridge indeed. With standard loading it has a .muzzle velocity of eight hundred and sixty feet per second and muzzle energy of two hundred and sixty foot-pounds. There are various barrel lengths, three and a half inch, five inch..."
   "All right, all right." M's voice was testy. "Take it as read. If you say it's the best I'll believe you. So it's the Walther and the Smith & Wesson. Send up one of each to 007. With the harness. And arrange for him to fire them in. Starting today. He's got to be expert in a week. All right? Then thank you very much, Armourer. I won't detain you."
   "Thank you, sir," said Major Boothroyd. He turned and marched stiffly out of the room.


 

The change from Beretta to Walther Wikipedia - Walther PP had been brought about in 1956 as the result of English gun writer Geoffrey Boothroyd writing to Ian Fleming:

Ian Fleming's letter to Geoffrey Boothroyd
Note the flawless formatting of Fleming's secretary Beryl Griffie-Williams. At that time secretaries were trained professionals.

Fleming to Boothroyd 1956-MAY-31:


KEMSLEY HOUSE, LONDON, W.C.1.
31st May, 1956
    Dear Mr Boothroyd,
    I really am most grateful for your splendid letter of May 23rd.
    You have entirely convinced me and I propose, perhaps not in the next volume of James Bonds memoirs but, in the subsequent one, to change his weapons in accordance with your instructions.
    Since I am not in the habit of stealing another mans expertise, I shall ask you in due course to accept remuneration for your most valuable technical aid.
    Incidentally, can you suggest where I can see a .38 Airweight in London. Who would have one?
    As a matter of interest, how do you come to know so much about these things? I was delighted with the photographs and greatly impressed by them. If ever there is talk of making films of some of James Bonds stories in due course, I shall suggest to the company concerned that they might like to consult you on some technical aspects. But they may not take my advice, so please do not set too much store by this suggestion.
    From the style of your writing it occurs to me that you may have written books or articles on these subjects. Is that so?
    Bond has always admitted to me that the .25 Beretta was not a stopping gun, and he places much more reliance on his accuracy with it than in any particular qualities of the gun itself. As you know, one gets used to a gun and it may take some time for him to settle down with the Smith and Wesson. But I think M. should advise him to make a change; as also in the case of the .357 Magnum.
    He also agrees to give a fair trial to the Bern Martin holster, but he is inclined to favour something a little more casual and less bulky. The well-worn chamois leather pouch under his left arm has become almost a part of his clothes and he will be loath to make a change though, here again, M. may intervene.
    At the present moment Bond is particularly anxious for expertise on the weapons likely to be carried by Russian agents and I wonder if you have any information on this.
    As Bonds biographer I am most anxious to see that he lives as long as possible and I shall be most grateful for any further technical advices you might like me to pass on to him.
Again, with very sincere thanks for your extremely helpful and workmanlike letter.
Yours sincerely
(Signed)
IAN FLEMING
    G. Boothroyd, Esq.,
    17, Regent Park Square,
    Glasgow, S


 

After Fleming and Boothroyd's lengthy correspondence, when the time came to produce Dr No (1962) , Fleming persuaded Broccoli and Salzman to hire Geoffrey Boothroyd as a firearms consultant. Boothroyd attended one of the launch parties.

- Note that in paragraph seven of his letter, Fleming displays an understanding of the relative effectiveness of different pistol calibers. Furthermore he describes Bond as 'and he places more reliance on its accuracy with it than in any particular qualities of the gun itself'. Fleming shows command of the subject in that he understands that a shot from the largest pistol badly placed will do almost nothing to stop the fight but a shot from the most feeble pistol which is well-placed with end the fight right there. Fleming also notes correctly that 'one gets used to a gun'. This factor can count for a lot in terms of effectiveness. And in a tight spot unfamiliarity with a new pistol can get you killed. This factor is so important that it generated one of the cardinal rules of pistol deployment, known as 'The Bianchi Rule'. The Bianchi Rule states that you should carry 'The same gun, in the same place, every day'. The rule is named after John Bianchi, the maker of holsters. Supposedly, the original story was about a cop who carried an automatic pistol on his hip as his duty gun during the day, and when off-duty, carried a Smith&Wesson J-frame snubby revolver in a shoulder holster. While he achieved his aim of being armed and ready at all times, he committed a dangerous mistake. The problem with training is that repetition creates grooves like railroad tracks which are greatly advantageous in producing the same result to the same stimuli, every time. Reactions become automatic and unconscious. It's over before you realised it happened. While that cop had to draw his duty automatic many times on the job and during training, he never had to draw his revolver. Therefore in response to a sudden threat, his arm would reach for his automatic, which was in a hip holster. The only time he was faced with a sudden threat while off duty his arm reached for his duty automatic on his hip ... which was not there. In that instance he managed to correct his mistake and get to his revolver in time to save his life. From this moment, the 'The Bianchi Rule' was created. From Fleming's statement 'one gets used to a gun' we can conclude that Fleming understood this at least partially, either from his training at Camp X-Ray or from speaking to someone who carried a pistol in earnest.

The motion picture Dr No (1962) is faithful to this scene in the novel Dr No (1958) and Bond is relieved of his Beretta and issued with a Walther . However, the Beretta visible in the motion picture is a Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 , and a Walther PP Wikipedia - Walther PP and not the Walther PPK of the novel.

Ian Fleming and Geoffrey Boothroyd inspect a Colt single-action
Ian Fleming and Goeffrey Boothroyd

 

From The Man with the Golden Typewriter by Fergus Fleming:

 


   FROM G. BOOTHROYD, 17 Regent Park Sq., Glasgow, S.1.
   May 23rd, 1956
   I have, by now, got rather fond of Mr. James Bond. I like most of the things about him, with the exception of his rather deplorable taste in firearms. In particular I dislike a man who comes into contact with all sorts of formidable people using a .25 Beretta. This sort of gun is really a lady’s gun, and not a really nice lady at that. If Mr. Bond has to use a light gun he would be better off with a .22 rim fire and the lead bullet would cause more shocking effect than the jacketed type of the .25.
   May I suggest that Mr. Bond is armed with a revolver? This has many advantages for the type of shooting that he is called upon to perform and I am certain that Mr. Leiter would agree with this recommendation. The Beretta will weigh, after it has been doctored, somewhere under one pound. If Mr. Bond gets himself an S. & W. .38 Special Centennial Airweight he will have a real man-stopper weighing only 13 ozs. The gun is hammerless so that it can be drawn without catching in the clothing and has an overall length of 6½”. Barrel length is 2”, note that it is not ‘sawn off.’ No one who can buy his pistols in the States will go to the trouble of sawing off pistol barrels as they can be purchased with short 2” barrels from the manufacturer. In order to keep down the bulk, the cylinder holds 5 cartridges, and these are standard .38 S&W Special. It is an extremely accurate cartridge and when fired from a 2” barrel has, in standard loading, a muzzle velocity of almost 860 ft./sec. and muzzle energy of almost 260 ft./lbs. This is against the .25 with M.V. of 758 ft./sec. but only 67 ft./lbs. muzzle energy. So much for his personal gun. Now he must have a real man stopper to carry in the car. For this purpose the S. & W. .357 Magnum has no equal except the .44 Magnum. However with the .357, Bond can still use his .38 S.W. Special cartridges in the Magnum but not vice versa. This can be obtained in barrel lengths as follows: 3½”, 5”, 6”, 6½” and 8¾” long. With a 6½” barrel and adjustable sights Bond could do some really effective shooting. The .357 Magnum has a MV of 1515 ft/sec. and a ME of 807 ft./lbs. Figures like these give an effective range of 300 yards, and it’s very accurate, too, 1” groups at 20 yards on a machine rest.
   With these two guns our friend would be able to cope with really quick draw work and long range effective shooting.
   Now to gun harness, rigs or what have you. First of all, not a shoulder holster for general wear, please. I suggest that the gun is carried in a Berns Martin Triple Draw holster. This type of holster holds the gun in by means of a spring and can be worn on the belt or as a shoulder holster. I have played about with various types of holster for quite a time now and this one is the best. I took some pictures of the holster some time ago and at present can only find the proofs but I send them to you to illustrate how it works. I have numbered the prints and give a description of each print below.
   ‘A’ Series. Holster worn on belt at right side. Pistol drawn with right hand.
   1.Ready position. Note that the gun is not noticeable.
   2.First movement. Weight moves to left foot. Hand draws back coat and sweeps forward to catch butt of pistol. Finger outside holster.
   3.Gun coming out of holster through the split front.
   4.In business.
   This draw can be done in 3/5ths of a second by me. With practice and lots of it you could hit a figure at 20 feet in that time.
   ‘B’ Series. Shoulder holster. Gun upside down on left side. Held in by spring. Drawn with right hand.
   1.First position.
   2.Coat drawn back by left hand, gun butt grasped by right hand, finger outside holster.
   3.Gun coming out of holster.
   4.Bang! You’re dead.
   ‘C’ Series. Holster worn as in A, but gun drawn with left hand.
   1.Draw commences. Butt held by first two fingers of left hand. Third finger and little finger ready to grasp trigger.
   2.Ready to shoot. Trigger being pulled by third and little finger, thumb curled round stock, gun upside down.
   This really works but you need a cut away trigger guard.
   ‘D’ Series. Holster worn on shoulder, as in ‘B’ Series, but gun drawn with left hand.
   1.Coat swept back with left hand and gun grasped.
   2.Gun is pushed to the right to clear holster and is ready for action.
   I’m sorry that I couldn’t find the better series of photographs but these should illustrate what I mean. The gun used is a .38 S.W. with a sawn off barrel to 2¾”. (I know this contradicts what I said over the page but I can’t afford the 64 dollars needed so I had to make my own.) It has target sights, ramp front sights, adjustable rear sight, rounded butt, special stocks and a cut away trigger guard.
   If you have managed to read this far I hope that you will accept the above in the spirit that it is offered. I have enjoyed your four books immensely and will say right now that I have no criticism of the women in them, except that I’ve never met any like them and would doubtless get into trouble if I did.
   FLEMING TO BOOTHROYD
   31st May, 1956
   I really am most grateful for your splendid letter of May 23rd.
   You have entirely convinced me, and I propose, perhaps not in the next volume of James Bond’s memoirs but in the subsequent one, to change his weapons in accordance with your instructions.
   Since I am not in the habit of stealing another man’s expertise, I shall ask you in due course to accept remuneration for your most valuable technical aid.
   Incidentally, can you suggest where I can see a .38 Airweight in London? Who would have one?
   As a matter of interest, how do you come to know so much about these things? I was delighted with the photographs and greatly impressed by them. If ever there is talk of making films of some of James Bond’s adventures in due course, I shall suggest to the company concerned that they might like to consult you on some technical aspects. But they may not take my advice, so please do not set too much store by this suggestion.
   From the style of your writing it occurs to me that you may have written books or articles on these subjects. Is that so?
   Bond has always admitted to me that the .25 Beretta was not a stopping gun, and he places much more reliance on his accuracy with it than in any particular qualities of the gun itself. As you know, one gets used to a gun and it may take some time for him to settle down with the Smith & Wesson. But I think M. should advise him to make a change; as also in the case of the .357 Magnum.
   He also agrees to give a fair trial to the Berns Martin holster, but he is inclined to favour something a little more casual and less bulky. The well-worn chamois leather pouch under his left arm has become almost part of his clothes, and he will be loath to make a change, though, here again, M. may intervene.
   At the present moment Bond is particularly anxious for expertise on the weapons likely to be carried by Russian agents, and I wonder if you have any information on this.
   As Bond’s biographer I am most anxious to see that he lives as long as possible and I shall be most grateful for any further technical advices you might like to pass on to him.
   Again, with very sincere thanks for your extremely helpful and workmanlike letter.


 

It seems almost certain that Geoffrey Boothroyd used the idea for the modifications to the Smith&Wesson Centennial from the text of Shooting to Live by Fairbairn and Sykes which was first published in 1942. Fairbairn and Sykes describe the modifications to a revolver (Colt New Service) which was to be used by under-cover officers. Fairbairn and Sykes were police officers in the Colonial police force which governed Shanghai between the wars. Shanghai was densely populated and covered in a rabbit warren of old buildings with narrow passages, steep stairways and wooden partitions. The streets were filled with market stalls. Pursuing criminals in these conditions would find you having to take shots at nearly contact distance, with the pistol barely drawn. One of the maxims coined by Fairbairn & Sykes was 'never go through a doorway without a full magazine'.

From Shooting to Live by Fairbairn and Sykes, first published 1942 and republished by Paladin Press, 1987. This book is still available from Paladin Press as are many like it.

Fairbairn & Sykes 'Shooting to Live' 1942
Shooting to Live by Fairbairn and Sykes, 1942

 

Fairbairn & Sykes 'Shooting to Live' 1942
Shooting to Live by Fairbairn and Sykes, 1942

From Shooting to Live by Fairbairn and Sykes, first published 1942:



    The weapon shown in the illustration started life as a .45 Colt Now Service double-action revolver with a 5-inch barrel, The hammer spur has been cut off, the barrel length reduced to 2 inches, the front part of the trigger-guard has been removed, and grooves have been cut on the left side of the butt for the middle, third and little fingers.


You can see in the above paragraphs that the description by Geoffrey Boothroyd matches exactly that given by Fairbairn & Sykes in their 1942 text. The modified revolver described by Fairbairn & Sykes would have been optimised for use in the conditions prevailing in Shanghai and tested extensively. There is no question over its suitability. For the kind of work they describe, a long shot would have been the whole way across a room, a maximum of three yards, and most encounters only one or two yards away with a target which appeared from nowhere during darkness of semi-darkness.

This modified pistol would have been unsuitable for use by James Bond for reasons outlined elsewhere on this page, the main reason being that it is too bulky. The secondary reason is that Bond may well have to take long shots with the only pistol he has on him, and this will involve the use of the sights.

 

 

+ THE WALTHER PP AND WALTHER PPK

- 'PP' stands for 'Police Pistol'. The 'K' in 'PPK' stands for 'Kriminale' as in 'Kripo' Wikipedia - Link - . The equivalent moniker in English would be 'Detective'.

Small Arms of the World published by Stackpole Books, Harrisburg, PA 1977,  11th revised edition
Small Arms of the World published by Stackpole Books, Harrisburg, PA, 1977, 11th revised edition, page 317, Walther PP Wikipedia - Walther PP and Walther PPK. For some reason there is no entry for these two pistols in the original 1943 edition.

 

Small Arms of the World published by Stackpole Books, Harrisburg, PA 1977,  11th revised edition
Small Arms of the World published by Stackpole Books, Harrisburg, PA, 1977, 11th revised edition, page 318, Walther PP Wikipedia - Walther PP and Walther PPK

 

Jane's Infantry Weapons 1982-1983
Jane's Infantry Weapons 1982-1983 , page 28, Walther PP Wikipedia - Walther PP and Walther PPK.
(On the original page, the compositor who laid up the page had labeled the PP and PPK the wrong way around, which I have corrected in this image).

 

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Walther - Walther Model 9 1921 - Walther PP Polizei Pistol
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell, published by Marbaro Books, 1991.

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Walther PP early model serial number 529
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell, published by Marbaro Books, 1991.

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Walther PP 7.65mm
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell, published by Marbaro Books, 1991.

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Walther PP sectioned drawing
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell, published by Marbaro Books, 1991.

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Walther PP sectioned drawing exploded parts diagram
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell, published by Marbaro Books, 1991.

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Walther PPK serial number Z6689K - experimental 9mm Parabellum Walther Modell MP Militarpistole 1929 1930
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell, published by Marbaro Books, 1991.

 

Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books - Walther MP in 9mm Parabellum
Handguns of the World by Edward C. Ezell, published by Marbaro Books, 1991.

 

Cartridges of the World by Frank C. Barnes 3rd Edition published by DBI Books, 1976, first published 1965  page 154 section 32 Auto 765mm
Cartridges of the World by Frank C. Barnes 3rd Edition published by DBI Books, 1976, first published 1965 , page 154

 

- The result is that in both the novel and the motion picture, Bond carries a Walther instead of the Beretta.

 

 

+ A NOTE ON AUTHORITIES:

- Small Arms of the World by H.B.Smith published by Military Service Publishing, 1943 is the original reference work on small arms and published in 1943. H.B.Smith had access to the firearms in question. Typically, American firearms writers have access to the firearms they are writing about and will also have opportunity to use them. Other firearms reference works only became available in the 1970s.

- Jane's Infantry Weapons 1982-1983, (first published 1975) was an extension of the Jane's Wikipedia - Link - series which was started by Fred Jane and published as Jane's Fighting Ships before WWII, which was the standard world-wide reference on fighting ships. In 1975 they added the Jane's Infantry Weapons to the series. Jane's reference works were to be found in government departments, in newspaper offices, and similar places which required an authoritative and comprehensive reference. The books were published annually and were expensive. Typically, Jane's would have referred directly to the manufacturer but were unlikely to have have placed hands upon the firearms in question. Their research was thorough however. In the late 1980s when main battle tanks were being armed with the new long-rod flechette (dart) rounds which required a high velocity smoothbore gun, the most important piece of intelligence desired by Allied intelligence agencies was the type of gun being fitted to the new Soviet main battle tank ("MBT"). Were the Soviets fitting the new smoothbore 5000fps+ long-rod dart gun which fired a depleted uranium rod stabilised by fins or were they fitting the traditional rifled barrel which fired either a 3500fps steel shell with a tungsten point or the shaped charge # ? If the Allies could determine which type of gun was fitted to the new tank (smoothbore or rifled), then they could choose a type of armor which would defeat it. If they chose the wrong type of armor, it could lose them the war. One British Army officer stationed in Berlin was shot while on a mission to the East when he attempted to take a photograph of the bore of one of the Soviet tanks. The CIA tried various means including satellites. They could have saved themselves a lot of trouble by referring to that year's edition of Jane's Armour and Artillery which contained the information they were seeking. Jane's had discovered this information by a telephone call to the French defence minister, who, on an exchange visit to Moscow had been taken on a tour of various military installations and had asked his opposite number what kind of gun the new main battle tank had been fitted with. Hence, the information had been in Jane's Armour and Artillery all along.

- Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C. Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books is a highly authoritative document produced using extensive reference to primary sources and original factory documentation and correspondence.

- Guns & Ammo: Almost invariably American firearms magazines such as Guns and Ammo will have used the firearm they are writing about and will have tested it on the range. In the United States firearms ownership is widespread and there will be many individuals in the publishing world and on its periphery whom own and use the firearms in question. Thus they may pronounce definitively on the attributes and qualities of a firearm. Geoffrey Boothroyd mentioned in one of his letters to Fleming 'I have written one thing on Scottish pistols, but tore it up after reading a really superb effort by an American. He had access to a lot more weapons and anyway, no use kidding myself, he knew how to write or the magazine re-wrote it for him'.

- Cartridges of the World by Frank C. Barnes was first published in 1965 and became the world authority on cartridges. However, remember that none of the narrative in Cartridges of the World will assess the suitability of cartridges for use in concealment pistols because it is a specialist application.

- In 1948 the US Army Ordinance Corps undertook some tests on captured Axis small-arms and published their findings. Geoffrey Boothroyd refers to it in his correspondence with Ian Fleming. Geoffrey Boothroyd owned a copy of this which he loaned to Fleming.

- Other early firearms references may be found here Link - Nakedscience Cartridge Bible early firearms references

In Geoffrey Boothroyd's letter to Fleming of 1956-JUN-01, he writes:


   [...]Now to the work. I doubt very much if you will be able to see a S. & W. Airweight model in England, at least in a shop. I therefore enclose S. & W. latest catalog, which shows current models. Perhaps you would let me have this back, as I have to send it off to another chap who is going to S. America and he wants to buy a gun when he gets there. The only people in London who may have S. & W. new-model pistols will be Thomas Bland and Sons, William IVth St., Strand. Current demand for pistols in this country is restricted to folks going off to Kenya, Malaya, etc. The few that know anything about pistols for close up work will probably buy modified guns from Cogswell and Harrison. This type is a cut-down S. & W. .38 Military & Police Model generally similar to the photo enclosed. You have seen this gun of mine and were quite interested. You may retain this print if you wish. (I had to learn photography as well, this is an improvement over earlier work.) I’m sorry I can’t help regarding an actual inspection of a new-model S. & W. The only people who may have one are Americans in this country or James Bond.[...]


You can see from the above paragraph that pistol ownership in England is thin on the ground even at this time, and that those purchasing pistols are heading out to deal with the Mau-Mau Insurrection or the Malayan Emergency. The pistol by Cogswell and Harrison to which Geoffrey Boothroyd refers was like a large Webley .455. I used one as a boy. The trigger was trigger-cocking ('double-action') and required me to grasp the pistol with both hands and use both of my forefingers to pull the trigger all the way back, such as the strength of the spring.

Clearly Fleming was familiar with the Webley type revolvers and how clumsy they were: From Octopussy (1966) by Ian Fleming:


   James Bond took a small blue leather notebook out of his inside pocket and turned the leaves. He stopped turning them. He looked up. “At that time, as side arms, you were carrying a regulation Webley-Scott forty-five with the serial number eight-nine-six-seven-three-sixty-two.”
   
   “It was certainly a Webley. Damned clumsy weapon. Hope they’ve got something more like the Luger or the heavy Beretta these days. But I can’t say I ever took a note of the number.”


 

 

+ SILENCERS

Geoffrey Boothroyd to Ian Fleming 1956-JUN-22


    Silencers. These I do not like. The only excuse for using one is on a .22 rifle using low-velocity ammunition, i.e., below the speed of sound. With apologies, I think you will find that silencers are more often found in fiction than in real life. An effective silencer on an auto pistol would be very ponderous and would spoil the balance of the gun, and to silence a revolver would be even more difficult due to the gas escape between the cylinder and the barrel. Personally I can’t at this stage see how one would fit a silencer to a Beretta unless a special barrel were made for it, as the silencer has to be screwed on to the barrel projecting in front of the slide on the Beretta.
   This business of using guns in houses or hotels is a very strange one. So few people are familiar with what a gun sounds like that I would have very little hesitation in firing one in any well constructed building. This remark is only regarding the noise or nuisance value. I would not fire a pistol in a room without some thoughts on the matter, as bullets have a bad habit of bouncing off things and coming home to roost. I have fired .455 blanks at home on several occasions even in the middle of the night without any enquiries being made, the last time was at Christmas when I blew out the candles on the Christmas cake with a pistol and blanks. To conclude, if possible don’t have anything to do with silencers.


- Geoffrey Boothroyd is correct in this matter. Pistol fire makes much less sound than a small firecracker. One of the problems with identifying pistol fire overheard in a city is that it is so quiet that you are never sure whether you have overheard some other type of noise. However, when in an environment which is quiet, and dealing with people who are attuned to the sounds of enemy action and listening for them, then you will most certainly require a silencer.

- A silencer/suppressor does not affect the path of velocity of a bullet. Once the bullet leaves the barrel there is only a slight impetus applied to it by the escaping gas cloud which escapes from the muzzle. This impetus is small enough that it would be difficult to measure and so for all purposes the bullet has the velocity at the start of its flight which it has the moment its base has left the barrel. Major Boothroyd states '... with very little reduction in muzzle velocity ...' but in fact the close confinement of the escaping gasses behind the bullet would provide a slighter greater impetus than with an unsilenced pistol, but again almost immeasurably small as a force.

- The only problem with a silencer is the difficult and fiddly work of adapting a small pistol to take a silencer. With a revolver, where the barrel is a fixed portion of the gun, the end of the barrel could be threaded on the outside and the silencer, but with an automatic, the slide fits over the barrel and one or both of them will move when the gun fires. This means that inside of the barrel on an automatic has to be threaded to receive a silencer. The problem with this is that, especially on a small automatic, there is very little spare material at the muzzle of the barrel. In order to fit the silencer, you have to

-- (1) Machine the first 10mm of the interior until you have a recess

-- (2) Cut a thread into the recess

-- (3) The end of the silencer will now thread into that thread. The interior of the end of the silencer must not touch the bullet as it passes and therefore its interior diameter must not protrude beyond the grooves in the rifling.

After the bullet passes into the body of the silencer, the volume of the chamber is divided by circular plates which have in their center a hole through which the bullet passes. The function of a silencer is the same as an auto muffler. The shockwave expands into the divisions within the silencer and then reflects back and forth within each chamber. By the time the remains of the shockwave make their way out of the end of the barrel, the turbulence of the gases and the chamber walls have diffused all of its force and the gases leave the aperture behind the bullet with a whoosh rather than a crack.

Pistols are not designed with the fitting of silencers in mind which means that fitting a silencer is a more difficult machining job than would otherwise be the case. This is particularly so on small automatic like the Beretta 418.

 

 

 

Let us examine Fleming's choice of Bond's Armament:

+ TERMINAL BALLISTICS

You do not have to be a genius at physics to know that a good big one beats a good little one nearly every time. It is the same with pistols.

Remember always, an element of doctrine: 'Your pistol is to fight your way to your rifle.' A pistol is carried because circumstances do not allow you to carry your rifle. Perhaps you are in a confined space. Perhaps you do not wish to be observed to be armed. Perhaps your hands are full with other matters.

The short barrel length of a pistol means that there is not much time to accelerate the bullet to any speed. The light weight of the pistol means that a hefty charge of gunpowder will make the pistol recoil savagely, particularly if held in one hand. This means that a pistol is a relatively weak device compared with a rifle.

Terminal Ballistics is the science of what happens when a projectile strikes an object. In our case, as the archaic use of the English phrase would have it, 'The King's Enemies'

If we examine Terminal Ballistics from the point of view of a coroner examining a dead body on a slab: What are the effects of bullet wounds ? The human body and indeed the bodies of all mammals require a supply of oxygen via their bloodstream to function. Failure to supply oxygen to the brain will result in unconsciousness followed by death. The body on the slab will have holes in major blood vessels which caused the blood to leak out. Once sufficient blood has leaked out, the victim will lose consciousness. The larger the blood vessel which is damaged, the more blood will leak out. Ultimately if the aorta is damaged, then unconsciousness may result in seconds. With the aorta still damaged and the heart still pumping furiously, large quantities of blood are being pumped out of the hole in the damaged aorta and the brain is failing to receive oxygenated blood. The hit to the aorta is superior to a hit in the heart for this reason. But both a hit to the heart and a hit to the aorta are effective in producing the desired result. The larger the hole in the blood vessel, the faster the incapacitation and death.

The last thing a surgeon who is operating on a live patient with a gunshot wound will not want to see is great big ragged holes in the the major arteries exiting from the heart. The patient will have minutes to live and the holes will be difficult or impossible to repair.

Ergo, if we are choosing a bullet, we need to chose a bullet which causes the most damage. Note that the cause of the most damage would be a bullet of the largest diameter. A long bullet will do no more damage than a short bullet of the same diameter. Note also that the speed of the bullet is irrelevant. A fast bullet will make the same wound faster than a slow bullet, but there will be no other differences.

Worse still a long bullet will be heavier than a short bullet and will make the gun recoil more. A fast bullet will make the gun recoil more than a slow bullet. Both of these effects are detrimental to the operation of the firearm and neither of them produce any more damage to the victim than the slow, wide bullet.

A sub-sonic bullet wound is a stab-wound, to the coroner examining a body on a slab. There is no difference whatsoever.

Therefore, the choice of bullet should be the largest diameter possible, within the other limitations placed upon your selection.

The reason we are choosing a pistol is because we cannot carry a rifle. Therefore on a small firearm, our ability to throw a bullet of large diameter is limited by the lightweight of that firearm, the pistol.

The pistol can be neither too large nor too heavy. Too large a pistol will mitigate the advantage we seek over a rifle, and too heavy a pistol will mean that the pistol is slow to deploy.

Even large male homo sapiens, with a height of over six feet and a weight of three-hundred pounds are able to operate a pistol which fires a bullet of no more diameter .45 of an inch. This is partly because of the size and power of the hands. A pistol firing a bullet diameter of .50 of an inch starts to become thicker than large hands can grasp, although powerful hands (powerful forearm muscles) are more use in controlling a large pistol or a pistol with heavy recoil.

If we were designing pistols for a bipedal hominid the size of a gorilla then the pistol could be a larger and with more recoil.

Typically, the largest pistol suitable for use by homo sapiens fires a bullet .45 of an inch in diameter. Driving the bullet faster would create more recoil and achieve no more wounding effect. Increasing the diameter of the bullet would make the pistol of a size which was unmanageable. So the figure stays at .45 of an inch. Some homo sapiens are large enough and strong enough to handle of a pistol firing .50 inch diameter bullet, but not many. Hence they are few pistols available in this category.

Remember, that 'your pistol is to fight your way to your rifle'. The pistol is a safety device like a AAD (Auxiliary Actuation Device) on your reserve parachute. It is there as a last-ditch device to save a situation which has suddenly developed into an emergency. If there was no emergency, then you would have had plenty of time to saunter over to your rifle, or to escape the scene and return under terms favorable to oneself, or to call for reinforcements.

With your pistol, just like the AAD on your reserve parachute, you have a couple of seconds to get hold of the situation and save your life, to fight back to a position where you dominate and control the situation to your satisfaction.

Pistols which fire bullets which are around .45 of an inch in diameter are no inconvenience to carry but do become difficult to conceal. Typically, the pistol will be worn on the belt and concealed using a loose fitting shirt which descends to the top of the thigh. This enables the shirt to be drawn rapidly out of the way and the pistol withdrawn from the holster in order to meet the sudden and unexpected threat.

In the case of James Bond, he will go about his business while posing as an ordinary individual, a mild-mannered ornithologist. This means that the pistol he chooses to carry will have to be more concealable than the 'full-size' .45" pistols which would be first choice. If someone notices Bond is armed, then his cover could be blown in a situation where his life would be in danger, surrounded by enemy forces. Concealment must be a priority.

If you are an ordinary individual walking along the street and someone notices that as you lean in to the trunk of your automobile, the end of your holster is visible underneath the hem of your lumberjack shirt then this is not serious. But for Bond, it could mean death.

Because of this requirement, we must select Bond's armament from the class of pistols below the 'full-size' pistols. We need a pistol which poses no danger of becoming visible and is not visible as a bulge under clothing. Bond may be dealing with people who are on the look-out for indicators, such as the under-arm bulge of a shoulder holster, which tell them they are dealing with agents.

This means that we require a pistol which is as small as possible, a diametrical opposite to the requirement that the pistol be as effective as possible. Effectiveness on the target is maximised when the pistol is as large as practical.

There is little we can do about this, and just have to accept that we must balance the two opposing requirements.

Fleming touches on this in his paragraph in From Russia with Love (1957) where Bond mentions that the Walther is a 'Bit more bulky than the Beretta', the slide on the Walther being wider than on the Beretta.

There are a raft of small pistols in this category, designed for concealment. Is Fleming's choice a good one ? Personally, my choice would be between exactly the two pistols Fleming selects: The Beretta and the Walther. I would choose between the Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 which fires .380ACP and the Walther PPK in 7.65mm. My choice would be the Beretta M1934 Wikipedia - Beretta M1934 , mainly because it is slimmer.

In my opinion Fleming displays an understanding of all the important details required for selecting a pistol for Bond's mission.

In Fleming's fifth James Bond novel Dr No (1958), the armourer Major Boothroyd states as part of his monologue "[...] It's a real stopping gun. Of course it's about a .32 calibre as compared with the Beretta's .25, but I wouldn't recommend anything lighter. [...]"

In the motion picture Dr No (1962), the armourer Major Boothroyd states that "with a delivery like a brick through a plate-glass window ".

This is an over-statement. Both of these are over-statements.

Those who do not have experience with firearms tend to over-state the effect of firearms in general and pistols in particular. This is because the pistol is such a powerful extension of the identity of men that, like other powerful extensions of identity, fast cars, fast boats, fast aircraft, knives and wrist-watches, they become imbued with psychological amplification. The narrator is actually describing the effect of the object on their identity, the leverage of that identity, rather than the physical Newtonian effect of the object on its environment.

Furthermore, because the narrator is actually seeking a leverage of their identity, that empty space of the leverage, which they seek to fill with the object, will be verbally defended because the leverage of the identity is so important to the narrator. The adjectives fly in all directions.

The Walther PPK would certainly have a psychological effect on the possessor of a "brick through a plate-glass window" but not on the recipient of the small piece of metal which it fires.

Myths grow up around objects which extend male identity: Guns, fast cars, fast boats, fast aircraft, and their derivatives such as wrist-watches. These myths require regular extinguishing because they begin to grow again the moment one's back is turned.

This situation is not helped by the gun-writers and automobile journalists and their search for ever greater thrilling reportage and ever greater adjectival amplification. There is such a thing as the 'gun-writer yard' which is 0.6 of an imperial yard. This accounts for the exceedingly long range at which all gun-writer shots are successfully concluded.

Women do not have their identity extended by physical control of their environment and so they do not suffer from the tendency to amplify the significance of objects which extend that physical control. Listening to women describe the experience of a driving fast cars or firing a gun is interesting because their description is not imbued with the psychological amplification of their power and thus their social identity which the object would give a male user. Women just report immediate physical sensations. Just the 'coffee' with none of the 'froth'. They do however perform the same process of adjectival amplification of objects which enhance their own social identity as women. It is just that those objects are not guns or fast cars.

However, Fleming is writing a dramatic novel and so adjectives will be the order of the day.

"Bond exchanged his very small pistol for a slightly larger very small pistol, which fired a slightly larger small bullet" is not going to amplify the identity of the reader who is imagining himself carrying a pistol and extending his control of his environment. The statement sounds flaccid. Hence:

"delivery like a brick through a plate glass window"

 

+ HOLSTERS

- In Fleming's first James Bond novel Casino Royale (1953) page 47.9 (Pan edition) Fleming describes Bond using a 'light chamois leather holster and slipped it over his left shoulder so that it hung about three inches below his arm-pit':


   With the thin vertical scar down his right cheek the general effect was faintly piratical. Not much of Hoagy Carmichael there, thought Bond, as he filled a flat, light gunmetal box with fifty of the Morland cigarettes with the triple gold band. Mathis had told him of the girl's comment.
He slipped the case into his hip pocket and snapped his oxidized Ronson Wikipedia - Ronson to see if it needed fuel. After pocketing the thin sheaf of ten-mille notes, he opened a drawer and took out a light chamois leather holster and slipped it over his left shoulder so that it hung about three inches below his arm-pit. He then took from under his shirts in another drawer a very flat .25 Beretta automatic with a skeleton grip, extracted the clip and the single round in the barrel and whipped the action to and fro several times, finally pulling the trigger on the empty chamber. He charged the weapon again, loaded it, put up the safety catch and dropped it into the shallow pouch of the shoulder-holster. He looked carefully round the room to see if anything had been forgotten and slipped his single-breasted dinner-jacket coat over his heavy silk evening shirt. He felt cool and comfortable. He verified in the mirror that there was absolutely no sign of the flat gun under his left arm, gave a final pull at his narrow tie and walked out of the door and locked it.


 

By the time we reach Fleming's fifth novel Dr No (1958), five years later, Bond is being relieved of his Beretta , which he carried 'light chamois leather holster' and is being issued with a Walther, to be carried in 'Berns Martin Triple-draw holster'.


   "It's a good gun, sir," Bond admitted. "Bit more bulky than the Beretta. How does the Armourer suggest I carry it?"
"Berns Martin Triple-draw holster," said Major Boothroyd succinctly. "Best worn inside the trouser band to the left. But it's all right below the shoulder. Stiff saddle leather. Holds the gun in with a spring. Should make for a quicker draw than that," he gestured towards the desk. "Three-fifths of a second to hit a man at twenty feet would be about right."


 

In Fleming's novel Dr No (1958), he describes the scene where Bond is relieved of his Beretta in M's office:


   
He walked over to the chair across the desk from M and sat down.
"'Morning, 007."
"Good morning, sir."
There was silence in the room except for the rasping of M's pipe. It seemed to be taking a lot of matches to get it going. In the background the fingernails of the sleet slashed against the two broad windows.
It was all just as Bond had remembered it through the months of being shunted from hospital to hospital, the weeks of dreary convalescence, the hard work of getting his body back into shape. To him this represented stepping back into life. Sitting here in this room opposite M was the symbol of normality he had longed for. He looked across through the smoke clouds into the shrewd grey eyes. They were watching him. What was coming? A post-mortem on the shambles which had been his last case? A curt relegation to one of the home sections for a spell of desk work? Or some splendid new assignment M had been keeping on ice while waiting for Bond to get back to duty?
M threw the box of matches down on the red leather desk. He leant back and clasped his hands behind his head.
"How do you feel? Glad to be back?"
"Very glad, sir. And I feel fine."
"Any final thoughts about your last case? Haven't bothered you with it till you got well. You heard I ordered an inquiry. I believe the Chief of Staff took some evidence from you. Anything to add?"
M's voice was businesslike, cold. Bond didn't like it. Something unpleasant was coming. He said, "No, sir. It was a mess. I blame myself for letting that woman get me. Shouldn't have happened."
M took his hands from behind his neck and slowly leant forward and placed them flat on the desk in front of him. His eyes were hard. "Just so." The voice was velvet, dangerous. "Your gun got stuck, if I recall. This Beretta of yours with the silencer. Something wrong there, 007. Can't afford that sort of mistake if you're to carry an oo number. Would you prefer to drop it and go back to normal duties?"
Bond stiffened. His eyes looked resentfully into M's. The licence to kill for the Secret Service, the double-o prefix, was a great honour. It had been earned hardly. It brought Bond the only assignments he enjoyed, the dangerous ones. "No, I wouldn't, sir."
"Then we'll have to change your equipment. That was one of the findings of the Court of Inquiry. I agree with it. D'you understand?"
Bond said obstinately, "I'm used to that gun, sir. I like working with it. What happened could have happened to anyone. With any kind of gun."
"I don't agree. Nor did the Court of Inquiry. So that's final. The only question is what you're to use instead." M bent forward to the intercom. "Is the Armourer there? Send him in."
M sat back. "You may not know it, 007, but Major Boothroyd's the greatest small-arms expert in the world. He wouldn't be here if he wasn't. We'll hear what he has to say."
The door opened. A short slim man with sandy hair came in and walked over to the desk and stood beside Bond's chair. Bond looked up into his face. He hadn't often seen the man before, but he remembered the very wide apart clear grey eyes that never seemed to flicker. With a non-committal glance down at Bond, the man stood relaxed, looking across at M. He said "Good morning, sir," in a flat, unemotional voice.
"Morning, Armourer. Now I want to ask you some questions." M's voice was casual. "First of all, what do you think of the Beretta, the -25?"
"Ladies' gun, sir."
M raised ironic eyebrows at Bond. Bond smiled thinly.
"Really! And why do you say that?"
"No stopping power, sir. But it's easy to operate. A bit fancy looking too, if you know what I mean, sir. Appeals to the ladies."
"How would it be with a silencer?"
"Still less stopping power, sir. And I don't like silencers. They're heavy and get stuck in your clothing when you're in a hurry. I wouldn't recommend anyone to try a combination like that, sir. Not if they were meaning business."
M said pleasantly to Bond, "Any comment, 007?"
Bond shrugged his shoulders. "I don't agree. I've used the .25 Beretta for fifteen years. Never had a stoppage and I haven't missed with it yet. Not a bad record for a gun. It just happens that I'm used to it and I can point it straight. I've used bigger guns when I've had to-the .45 Colt with the long barrel, for instance. But for close-up work and concealment I like the Beretta." Bond paused. He felt he should give way somewhere. "I'd' agree about the silencer, sir. They're a nuisance. But sometimes you have to use them."
"We've seen what happens when you do," said M drily. "And as for changing your gun, it's only a question of practice. You'll soon get the feel of a new one." M allowed a trace of sympathy to enter his voice. "Sorry, 007. But I've decided. Just stand up a moment. I want the Armourer to get a look at your build."
Bond stood up and faced the other man. There was no warmth in the two pairs of eyes. Bond's showed irritation. Major Boothroyd's were indifferent, clinical. He walked round Bond. He said "Excuse me" and felt Bond's biceps and forearms. He came back in front of him and said, "Might I see your gun?"
Bond's hand went slowly into his coat. He handed over the taped Beretta with the sawn barrel. Boothroyd examined the gun and weighed it in his hand. He put it down on the desk. "And your holster?"
Bond took off his coat and slipped off the chamois leather holster and harness. He put his coat on again.
With a glance at the lips of the holster, perhaps to see if they showed traces of snagging. Boothroyd tossed the holster down beside the gun with a motion that sneered. He looked across at M. "I think we can do better than this, sir." It was the sort of voice Bond's first expensive tailor had used.
Bond sat down. He just stopped himself gazing rudely at the ceiling. Instead he looked impassively across at M.
"Well, Armourer, what do you recommend?"
Major Boothroyd put on the expert's voice. "As a matter of fact, sir," he said modestly, "I've just been testing most of the small automatics. Five thousand rounds each at twenty-five yards. Of all of them, I'd choose the Walther PPK 7.65 mm. It only came fourth after the Japanese M-14, the Russian Tokarev and the Sauer M-38. But I like its light trigger pull and the extension spur of the magazine gives a grip that should suit 007. It's a real stopping gun. Of course it's about a .32 calibre as compared with the Beretta's .25, but I wouldn't recommend anything lighter. And you can get ammunition for the Walther anywhere in the world. That gives it an edge on the Japanese and the Russian guns." M turned to Bond. "Any comments?"
"It's a good gun, sir," Bond admitted. "Bit more bulky than the Beretta. How does the Armourer suggest I carry it?"
"Berns Martin Triple-draw holster," said Major Boothroyd succinctly. "Best worn inside the trouser band to the left. But it's all right below the shoulder. Stiff saddle leather. Holds the gun in with a spring. Should make for a quicker draw than that," he gestured towards the desk. "Three-fifths of a second to hit a man at twenty feet would be about right."
"That's settled then." M's voice was final. "And what about something bigger?"
"There's only one gun for that, sir," said Major Boothroyd stolidly. "Smith & Wesson Centennial Airweight. Revolver. •38 calibre. Hammerless, so it won't catch in clothing. Overall length of six and a half inches and it only weighs thirteen ounces. To keep down the weight, the cylinder holds only five cartridges. But by the time they're gone," Major Boothroyd allowed himself a wintry smile, "somebody's been killed. Fires the -38 S & W Special. Very accurate cartridge indeed. With standard loading it has a .muzzle velocity of eight hundred and sixty feet per second and muzzle energy of two hundred and sixty foot-pounds. There are various barrel lengths, three and a half inch, five inch..."
"All right, all right." M's voice was testy. "Take it as read. If you say it's the best I'll believe you. So it's the Walther and the Smith & -Wesson. Send up one of each to 007. With the harness. And arrange for him to fire them in. Starting today. He's got to be expert in a week. All right? Then thank you very much, Armourer. I won't detain you."
"Thank you, sir," said Major Boothroyd. He turned and marched stiffly out of the room.
There was a moment's silence. The sleet tore at the windows. M swivelled his chair and watched the streaming panes. Bond took the opportunity to glance at his watch. Ten o'clock. His eyes slid to the gun and holster on the desk. He thought of his fifteen years' marriage to the ugly bit of metal. He remembered the times its single word had saved his life-and the times when its threat alone had been enough. He thought of the days when he had literally dressed to kill-when he had dismantled the gun and oiled it and packed the bullets carefully into the springloaded magazine and tried the action once or twice, pumping the cartridges out on to the bedspread in some hotel bedroom somewhere round the world. Then the last wipe of a dry rag and the gun into the little holster and a pause in front of the mirror to see that nothing showed. And then out of the door and on his way to the rendezvous that was to end with either darkness or light. How many times had it saved his life? How many death sentences had it signed? Bond felt unreasonably sad. How could one have such ties with an inanimate object, an ugly one at that, and, he had to admit it, with a weapon that was not in the same class as the ones chosen by the Armourer? But he had the ties and M was going to cut them.
M swivelled back to face him. "Sorry, James," he said, and there was no sympathy in his voice. "I know how you like that bit of iron. But I'm afraid it's got to go. Never give a weapon a second chance-any more than a man. I can't afford to gamble with the double-o section. They've got to be properly equipped. You understand that? A gun's more important than a hand or a foot in your job."
Bond smiled thinly. "I know, sir. I shan't argue. I'm just sorry to see it go."
"All right then. We'll say no more about it. Now I've got some more news for you. There's a job come up. In Jamaica. Personnel problem. Or that's what it looks like. Routine investigation and report. The sunshine'll do you good and you can practise your new guns on the turtles or whatever they have down there. You can do with a bit of holiday. Like to take it on?"
Bond thought: He's got it in for me over the last job. Feels I let him down. Won't trust me with anything tough. Wants to see. Oh well! He said: "Sounds rather like the soft life, sir. I've had almost too much of that lately. But if it's got to be done... If you say so, sir..."
"Yes," said M. "I say so."


Note that M states Your gun got stuck, if I recall. This Beretta of yours with the silencer. Something wrong there, 007, which is the stated cause of Bond being relieved of his Beretta and issued with the Walther PPK.

 

From Fleming's novel From Russia with Love (1957) , Chapter 28, Bond is posing as Nash to meet Nash's SPECTRE handler, Colonel Kleb. Fleming describes how Bond's pistol becomes caught as he tries to draw it:


She stabbed downwards at his legs. Bond lashed out with his feet and hurled her sideways. She had aimed at his legs! As he got to one knee, Bond knew what the coloured tips of the needles meant. It was poison. Probably one of those German nerve poisons. All she had to do was scratch him, even through his clothes.
Bond was on his feet. She was coming at him again. He tugged furiously at his gun. The silencer had caught. There was a flash of light. Bond dodged. One of the needles rattled against the wall behind him and the dreadful chunk of woman, the white bun of wig askew on her head, the slimy lips drawn back from her teeth, was on top of him.
Bond, not daring to use his naked fists against the needles, vaulted sideways over the desk.


 

 

 

+ BERNS-MARTIN

Berns-Martin Lightnin Triple-Draw holster factory advertisement
Berns-Martin Wikipedia - Berns-Martin Lightnin Triple-Draw holster factory advertisement. Bianchi continued to produce the Triple-Draw after Berns-Martin folded.

 

From No Second Place Winner by Bill Jordan Wikipedia - Bill Jordan, US Marine, Border Patrolman, Pistolero , 1965, page 23:


   Since the right hip carry is the most popular and most desireable position , some discussion of equipment is available and how it should be worn is in order. The plain, open top style, in most general use, is generally conceded to be the most practical and efficient holster available and is the holster of which this chapter is most descriptive. In addition to it, the two other holsters designed to be worn on the right hip are in some usage. One of these, a type in which the weapon is held in place in by flat springs and is drawn by shoving it forward through the slitted front of the holster, is known as the Berns-Martin Wikipedia - Berns-Martin model. This holster has attained considerable well merited popularlity. Its strongest point is the security with which the gun is carried. Due to the holster's construction the gun could not be taken from behind the from behind by an assailant and could only be pulled out through the front of the holster It is at its best where the officer must work in thick crowds. It is my opinion that its greatest drawbacks are that it does not expose enough of the gun butt or any of the trigger guard; it offers resistance in drawing followed by complete lack of resistance as the weapon is freed from the retaining springs, making control and alignment difficult; and last, possibly a minor point, but one which has affected its popularity adversely, it is homely. Although not as fast as and not allowing as positive control of the open type, this is a rugged, reliable holster which will give good service.


Bill Jordan was a former US Marine and a long-time Border Patrolman who had used his pistols and holsters in action, in real life, and thus his opinion counts heavily on any of these matters.

Berns-Martin Lightnin Triple-Draw holster - Calhoun Missouri

 

What Fleming did not grasp in time was that the Berns-Martin Triple-Draw was a split-front holster designed for revolvers. It gripped the revolver on the cylinder. It it was not designed for automatics. Geoffrey Boothroyd had intended that Bond carry a revolver instead of his 'Beretta' and had written' May I suggest that Mr. Bond is armed with a revolver? This has many advantages for the type of shooting that he is called upon to perform and I am certain that Mr. Leiter would agree with this recommendation'. Boothroyd, writing for Handgunner magazine in the 1980s relates how Fleming had misunderstood Boothroyd's communication. Boothroyd himself owned a Berns-Martin 'Triple-Draw' and carried a revolver within it. Boothroyd had intended that Fleming have bond carry a revolver in the 'Triple-Draw' but Fleming had selected the Walther PPK and then the Berns-Martin 'Triple-Draw', into which the Walther PPK would not fit in real life.

From Handgunner (1985) Number 28 'Armourer to 007' by Geoffrey Boothroyd:


   I sent Fleming quite a number of photographs to illustrate the points I was trying to make. There were some of aerial shooting, and quite a number of the chopped revolver and the Berns-Martin rig worn in various styles and locations. The holster, in fact, had been made up especially for me by Jack Martin to accommodate the non-standard barrel on the gun. At about the same time, Bill Scroggie in Britain in Britain also made a number of experimental holsters using a similar retention system. But it was the shot of the Smith being drawn from the tooled Berns-Martin that caught Fleming's fancy. He asked if he could borrow the gun for the cover for the forth-coming volume From Russia with Love.
   By this time Fleming had retired to his little house in Jamaica, where he had a practically unfurnished study with a desk facing a bare white wall to minimise distractions. It was there that the worked most efficiently and the book he was working on at the time was Dr No , in which "Major Boothroyd" figure first appears as Q "the armourer" and rearms Bond, rather against his inclinations, with a 7.65mm Walther PPK automatic and an S&W revolver - a Centennial Airweight that was soon lost in the sands of Crab Key. It was the PPK that made the running, and I was aghast as anyone to find it in a Berns-Martin. A flood of letters from all over the world descended on Fleming, drawing attention, without exception very courteously, to the gaffe. All were passed to me for reply, a task which I eventually completed and which I must confess I quite enjoyed.
   This was scarcely the only firearms-related faux pas in the Bond series, and I am still decades later, asked how they came about. Often the difficulty lay in grafting expertise. The final decisions were taken by Ian: my role was to give him options and alternatives. The revolver, which I had favoured, was ditched on page 142 of Dr No , never to reappear. Fleming's instincts as a writer can scarcely be faulted, for the PPK was a stupendous success and became, more than anything else, Bond's trademark. The reason that it first appeared in the Berns-Martin was that Ian did not understand, which is to say that I had not made it sufficiently clear to him, that the holster only worked with revolvers - it functioned by grasping the cylinder.


 

Handgunner 1985 Number 28 'Armourer to 007' by Geoffrey Boothroyd

 

Handgunner 1985 Number 28 'Armourer to 007' by Geoffrey Boothroyd

 

Handgunner 1985 Number 28 'Armourer to 007' by Geoffrey Boothroyd

 

Handgunner 1985 Number 28 'Armourer to 007' by Geoffrey Boothroyd

 

Handgunner 1985 Number 28 'Armourer to 007' by Geoffrey Boothroyd

 

Handgunner 1985 Number 28 'Armourer to 007' by Geoffrey Boothroyd

Handgunner 1985 Number 28 'Armourer to 007' by Geoffrey Boothroyd

Theses images were obtained by Link - Integrated Close Combat Forum http://iccf.freeforums.org/ , which had been provided by Richard Bhella

 

However, if my opinion, Fleming's appreciation of Bond's mission requirements is superior to Geoffrey Boothroyd's. Fleming knew that Bond required concealment above all else: Bond's cover was as a playboy. Fleming specifies a very small automatic the thinnest possible holster. A revolver is much thicker because of the cylinder and the Berns-Martin Triple-Draw is quite a thick revolver holster. This would have developed quite a bulge under Bond's suit jacket coat. It is distantly conceivable that a Berns-Martin Triple-Draw could be altered to accept a Walther PPK. However, it would be easier to just build a holster from scratch which used a spring-pressure retainer on the slide of the automatic, if that is what you wanted.

Furthermore in one scene Fleming describes Bond using the Berns-Martin Triple-Draw as in inside-the-waistband holster ('IWB') but this would be hard or impossible to operate because the Triple-Draw is a split-front holster, which means the pistol does not come out of the top. The result would have been a tangled fumble.

The Berns-Martin Triple-Draw has a spring in the holster makes a noticeable 'clop' sound when you draw the pistol from the holster. Hardly a desirable quality in a holster for use by James Bond and that characteristic alone would rule out the Berns-Martin Triple-Draw as being first choice for Bond. Boothroyd does not mention this.

Overall, Fleming's orginal choice of pistol and holster is, in my opinion, superior to Geoffrey Boothroyd's. Fleming choses a very slim Beretta which has been made even slimmer. Geoffrey Boothroyd choses a much larger revolver in a much larger holster. By the time Bond needs to destroy something or somebody then it is time to summon the Navy. Ideally, his target never knows anything about it until the Royal Marines arrive. If Bond carried a give-away like a large revolver and a larger holster, he may well have to use it, because he may well be discovered much earlier in his mission than he had anticipated.

The problem with gun experts, even published gun experts, is that they tend to hold a great variety of opinions and hold them firmly. The only way of reducing all of that opinion to fact is by results from real-life action or testing in the best simulation possible. Very few test their theories in simulated courses of fire and fewer still either see action or work with those who have seen action in sufficient quantity to form a body of data. Fleming could not know that Geoffrey Boothroyd, although a thoroughly splendid chap in all respects, was just one gun expert among many. While Geoffrey Boothroyd was an able experimenter he had not seen action in order to test his theories or opinions. Actually seeing action completely alters the focus when it comes to dealing with equipment, especially equipment which will be saving one's life.

Perhaps the benefit of Fleming's misunderstanding of Geoffrey Boothroyd's recommendations is that:

- (1) We enjoy a dramatic scene where Bond is relieved of his Beretta. Fleming is given an opportunity to have the different firearms appear in the text other than by listing as part of the background illustration. A dramatic scene makes for much better reading if you have to introduce objects, then merely describing them.

- (2) Bond carries a Walther PPK. Difficult to imagine him carrying anything else. Walther are certainly grateful for this.

In my opinion, Fleming displays a better understanding of the attributes of the firearms and holsters suitable for Bond's mission than Geoffrey Boothroyd does. As ever with missions-behind-enemy-lines, you must avoid getting into a shoot-out at all costs because at most, you have total of three magazines including the one in your pistol. That's twenty-something rounds, each one of which must count. They enemy are carrying a lot more ammunition and there will be more and more of them as soon as the alarm has been raised. These kind of odds in no way enhance you ability to survive long enough to undertake another mission. This means that your policy and tactics must involve avoiding contact with the enemy unless there is no other way. At which point it is, most likely, luck which will save you, rather than the ability to shoot your way out.

My personal choice for Bond would be the Beretta M1934 in 9mm Corto / .380 Auto carried in a soft leather holster which like the chamois leather holster which conformed tightly to the contour of the pistol and would make a thinner bulge than a typical saddle leather holster. The straps would have to be wide, thin elastic and without any buckles which would show through the cloth of the suit jacket. The Beretta M1934 is thinner than Walther PPK but not as slim as a Beretta 418. But I have enjoyed using the models of Beretta M1934 I have handled. If I was instructed by M to use a Walther PPK it would be one of the wartime production (together with Waffenamt stamp) or pre-war as these models I have used had a greatly superior trigger to the post-war production models. And the thought of Bond using a wartime Waffenamt-stamped Walther PPK really tops off his list of top-drawer accessories, his Dunhill cigarette case, his Ronson cigarette lighter, his Rolex Submariner and his Waffenamt stamped Walther PPK.

 

- HOLSTERS IN GENERAL

The change from Beretta to Walther PPK had been brought about in 1956 as the result of English gun writer Geoffrey Boothroyd writing to Ian Fleming:

The 'full-size' pistols are normally carried on the belt but their smaller brethren the concealment pistols may be carried just about anywhere, depending on the requirement. There are:

- Ankle holsters.

- Thigh holsters: Frequently military holsters for those who drive vehicles.

- Belt holsters (right side, left side)

- 'IWB' inside-the-waist-band holsters

- Pocket holsters

- Shoulder holsters

- Tanker holsters: Worn across the chest because there is no room on either side of the seat in a tank or AFV

- Holsters which go inside your hat

In Flemings first Bond novel Casino Royale (1953) page 47.9 (Pan edition) Fleming issues Bond with a light chamois leather holster:


   With the thin vertical scar down his right cheek the general effect was faintly piratical. Not much of Hoagy Carmichael there, thought Bond, as he filled a flat, light gunmetal box with fifty of the Morland cigarettes with the triple gold band. Mathis had told him of the girl's comment.
He slipped the case into his hip pocket and snapped his oxidized Ronson Wikipedia - Ronson to see if it needed fuel. After pocketing the thin sheaf of ten-mille notes, he opened a drawer and took out a light chamois leather holster and slipped it over his left shoulder so that it hung about three inches below his arm-pit. He then took from under his shirts in another drawer a very flat .25 Beretta automatic with a skeleton grip, extracted the clip and the single round in the barrel and whipped the action to and fro several times, finally pulling the trigger on the empty chamber. He charged the weapon again, loaded it, put up the safety catch and dropped it into the shallow pouch of the shoulder-holster. He looked carefully round the room to see if anything had been forgotten and slipped his single-breasted dinner-jacket coat over his heavy silk evening shirt. He felt cool and comfortable. He verified in the mirror that there was absolutely no sign of the flat gun under his left arm, gave a final pull at his narrow tie and walked out of the door and locked it.


 

In Diamonds are Forever (1956) Fleming shows his understanding of US concealed-carry practices when he has one of the characters narrate to Bond "Better watch out for any fellow with a coat on. Nobody wears 'em here save to house the artillery.".


   "Bet ya life he's looking at ya pictures right now," said the driver. "Sixteen-millimetre camera in that shaving kit. Just pull down the zip and press y'arm against it and off it goes. He'll have taken fifty feet. Straight and profile. And that'll be with Mug Identification at Headquarters this afternoon, with a list of what ya got in ya bag. Ya don't look as if ya're carryin' a gun. Mebbe it's a flat holster job. But if ya're, there'll be another man with a gun alongside all the time ya're in the rooms. Word'll be sent down the line by this evening. "
"Well, thanks," said Bond, annoyed with himself. "I can see I'll have to keep a bit wider awake. Pretty good machine they seem to have here."
The driver grunted affirmatively and drove on in silence. Better watch out for any fellow with a coat on. Nobody wears 'em here save to house the artillery."
"Well, thanks," said Bond, annoyed with himself. "I can see I'll have to keep a bit wider awake. Pretty good machine they seem to have here."
The driver grunted affirmatively and drove on in silence.


- In warmer States during shirt-sleeve weather, the only way of carrying concealed is to wear a 'concealment garment' like a lumberjack shirt or a photographers vest, which are termed in the trade by those who are overly self-conscious about their concealed pistol a 'shoot me first' vest.

In Fleming's fourth novel From Russia with Love (1957) Bond is in Room 204 of the Paris Ritz being attacked by Rosa Kleb and having flung himself out of the way of an exploding telephone is attempting to dodge poisoned knitting needles while drawing his pistol from the waist-band of his trousers. The silencer catches on the waist-band:


   
   She stabbed downwards at his legs. Bond lashed out with his feet and hurled her sideways. She had aimed at his legs! As he got to one knee, Bond knew what the coloured tips of the needles meant. It was poison. Probably one of those German nerve poisons. All she had to do was scratch him, even through his clothes.
   Bond was on his feet. She was coming at him again. He tugged furiously at his gun. The silencer had caught. There was a flash of light. Bond dodged. One of the needles rattled against the wall behind him and the dreadful chunk of woman, the white bun of wig askew on her head, the slimy lips drawn back from her teeth, was on top of him.
   Bond, not daring to use his naked fists against the needles, vaulted sideways over the desk.


In the above paragraph we can see that Bond is carrying his pistol inside his waist-band. The pistol catches as he tries to draw it. If you stand in your own room and draw a silenced pistol from your waist-band, it hardly seems likely that it would jam while doing so. However, during rapid action and gymnastics, 'Murphy's Law' operates in a degree proportional to the rapidity of the action and the level of the emergency. If you open your front door with your front door key, it seems to happen reasonably quickly on a daily basis. Try doing it when you are in a roaring hurry and I guarantee that it will bind, jam and you will have to re-apply the pressure. It will seem to take minutes and there is the danger of breaking the key. Bond is in the middle of diving from left to right and jumping over furniture in order to avoid being killed. There is plenty of opportunity for things to go wrong.

In Fleming's fifth novel Dr No (1958), Bond is being relieved of his Beretta and its chamois leather holster and is issued with a Walther PPK and the Berns-Martin triple-draw holster:


   "It's a good gun, sir," Bond admitted. "Bit more bulky than the Beretta. How does the Armourer suggest I carry it?"
"Berns Martin Triple-draw holster," said Major Boothroyd succinctly. "Best worn inside the trouser band to the left. But it's all right below the shoulder. Stiff saddle leather. Holds the gun in with a spring. Should make for a quicker draw than that," he gestured towards the desk. "Three-fifths of a second to hit a man at twenty feet would be about right."


 

Five years later in Fleming's eleventh novel On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1963), Bond is at the at the Hôtel Maison Rouge in Strasbourg preparing for the helicopter assault on Piz Gloria when he mentions that Bond is using a inside-waist-band holster made from 'stitched pigskin'.


    At the Maison Rouge, a fine room had been booked for Bond. He was greeted with exaggerated courtesy tinged with reserve. Where didn't the freemasonry of the Union operate? Bond, obedient to the traditions of the town, made a simple dinner off the finest foie gras, pink and succulent, and half a bottle of champagne, and retired gratefully to bed. He spent the next morning in his room, changed into his ski clothes, and sent out for a pair of snow-goggles and thin leather gloves, sufficient to give some protection to his hands but close-fitting enough for the handling of his gun. He took the magazine out of his gun, pumped out the single round in the chamber and practised shooting himself in the wardrobe mirror with the gloves on until he was satisfied. Then he reloaded and got the fitting of the stitched pigskin holster comfortable inside the waist-band of his trousers. He had his bill sent up and paid it, and ordered his suitcase to be forwarded on to Tracy at the Vier Jahreszeiten Link - Hotel Vier Jahreszeiten. Then he sent for the day's papers and sat in front of the window, watching the traffic in the street and forgetting what he read.


From On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1963)


   The man stood aside so as to have a clear field of fire while his Number Two removed Bond's Walther PPK from the soft leather holster inside his trouser belt and ran expert hands down his sides, down his arms to the wrists and down the inside of his thighs. Then Number Two stood back, pocketed the Walther and again took out his own gun.


 

From The Man with the Goldern Gun (1965):


   Bond had been sitting with his chin propped on his right hand. He now dropped the hand to the counter and sat back. The Walther PPK inside the waistband of his trousers to the left of his flat stomach signalled its presence to his skin. The fingers of his right hand curled slightly, ready to receive its butt. He moved his left foot off the rail of the stool onto the floor. He said, "That'd be fine." He unbuttoned his coat with his left hand and then, with the same hand, took out his handkerchief and wiped his face with it. "It always gets extra hot around six before the Undertaker's Wind has started to blow."


 

 

 

- Gun-leather is a more flexible topic compared to Terminal Ballistics, with the selection of the best holster being determined by the pistol, the size and shape of the wearer, the type of clothing which he will wear and the mission. There are some determinants which are either/or such as

- SPEED: For full-size pistols in belt-holsters, a holster designed for speed will be mounted low - more toward the thigh than the hip - and have a forward cant as well as been relatively 'open' with little protection for the pistol and little retention for the pistol IE the pistol could fall from the holster if you take a tumble.

- PROTECTION: The belt-mounted 'military' holster has a cap over the pistol butt which full surrounds the pistol and prevents flying debris from enter the holster and the pistol mechanism. These holsters are slow on the draw because you have to pull back the hinged leather cap before you can draw the pistol. When I was in Courmayeur searching for the Italian Job (1969) locations someone telephoned to the Carabinieri and the officer had to approach a dangerous-looking desperado in order get him to hand over his papers. As I stepped toward him while keeping him talking, he had to fumble with the hinged leather cap on his military holster. He would have been in trouble if I really had been a marauding desperado.

- RETENTION: Belt-mounted holsters designed for speed have to have the minimum of obstruction to the withdrawal of the pistol and the minimum of grip on the pistol itself. This means that if you have to run at top speed, or take a somersault, then the pistol may fly out of the holster. Not only will you have to retrieve your pistol but it may be full of dirt and jam when you try to use it. Some holsters have a variable tension device which can be adjusted to give just the right amount of grip on the pistol.

Gun leather is not so much a subject-in-its-self, it is more like a minor religion. There are major factory manufacturers of off-the-shelf holsters as well as a number of small specialist shops which manufacture either specialist gun-leather or custom gun-leather. These specialist shops are normally one-man owner-operator and rarely outlive the individual who designers and makes the gun-leather although the legendary name lives on for decades. Often, a larger factory holster maker will purchase the name of the shop and the rights to the design of their holsters.

The older generation of pistol users, whom are now dying off, tend to wear leather holsters but in the 1970s, synthetic materials started to be employed in holster manufacture and in some applications synthetic materials can be superior. However, most gun users hold leather in higher regard and in the application under consideration - James Bond - would select leather construction.

If James Bond had the best - the best wrist-watch, the best cigarettes, the best champagne - then which holster would he use ? The best holster is the one which works best with your mission, your mode of dress. Most likely it would be a holster made especially by one of the specialist makers. There are holster-makers in England but nearly all of them are in the United States for obvious reasons. The holster would, as Fleming suggests, be designed to for the minimum silhouette, above all other factors.

For a superb introduction into the science and application of holsters I recommend No Second Place Winner by former US Marine and border patrolman Bill Jordan Wikipedia - Bill Jordan, US Marine, Border Patrolman, Pistolero , 1965.

 

 

 

Novel

Motion Picture

Holster

 

 

 

 

1953

Casino Royale (1953)

 

light chamois leather holster and slipped it over his left shoulder so that it hung about three inches below his arm-pit

1956

Diamonds are Forever (1956)

 

 

1957

From Russia with Love (1957)

 

Bond carries silenced Beretta in waistband of his trousers

1958

Dr No (1958)

 

Berns Martin Triple-draw holster - worn inside the trouser band or under the armpit

 

 

 

 

1962

 

Dr No (1962)

Bond enters carrying Beretta M1934 on screen

1962

 

Dr No (1962)

Bond issued with Walther PP on screen - same holster - appears to be chamois

1963

  From Russia with Love (1963)  

1963

On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1963)

 

Inside-waist-band holster made from 'stitched pigskin'

1965

The Man with the Goldern Gun (1965)

 

Inside the waistband of his trousers to the left

1964

 

Goldfinger (1964)

Wears a chamois leather holster which appears to be same as in Dr No (1962).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

+ DRAWSTROKE

 


   "It's a good gun, sir," Bond admitted. "Bit more bulky than the Beretta. How does the Armourer suggest I carry it?"
"Berns Martin Triple-draw holster," said Major Boothroyd succinctly. "Best worn inside the trouser band to the left. But it's all right below the shoulder. Stiff saddle leather. Holds the gun in with a spring. Should make for a quicker draw than that," he gestured towards the desk. "Three-fifths of a second to hit a man at twenty feet would be about right."


 

In Chapter II of his novel From Russia with Love (1957) Fleming mentions the speed with which Bond should be able hit a target using the Walther PPK and the Berns Martin Triple-draw holster: Should make for a quicker draw than that," he gestured towards the desk. "Three-fifths of a second to hit a man at twenty feet would be about right."

In a defensive situation, the speed with which you can draw your pistol and shoot is going to be a factor in saving one's life. Not only that, the identity of man is as greatly leveraged by him begin able to complete a fast-draw as it is by the possession of pistol. It is inevitable that Fleming, when defining Bond, will issue him with the best pistol available and make sure that Bond is capable of completing a fast-draw.

+ THE BIANCHI RULE

- Worth mentioning here is an element of doctrine relating to the drawstroke in defensive pistol use, termed 'The Bianchi Rule'. The Bianchi Rule states that:

'You carry the same pistol, in the same place, every day.'.

This is because your reactions, if sufficiently trained, will operate in only one way during an emergency: The way you have trained them. There was a cop who carried an automatic in a belt holster during his day job, and a Smith&Wesson J frame revolver, in a shoulder holster when off duty. While off duty he was attacked and had to defend himself in a split-second. His hand reached for his duty automatic on his belt holster, which was not there. There are many examples of this kind of error. If you have trained in one particular manner and then change to a new firearm and a new method of carry, it produces a 'training scar' where all your physical reactions are wired up to the old method. Extensive re-training is required to re-train the muscles in the new method. Bond, in his cover as playboy, has limited ability to carry any other kind of pistol than his issue Beretta or Walther PPK, so it is not something which need concern him. However, Bond's failure to observe the Bianchi Rule would get him killed just as fast as anyone else.

- DOCTRINE IN THE FIFTIES

- - In the Nineteen Fifties the only published doctrine on pistol use and thus the drawstroke was Shooting to Live by Fairbairn and Sykes first published in 1942. This would remain so until Bill Jordan published No Second Place Winner in 1965. Fairbairn and Sykes had developed their doctrine by trial and error while working as policemen in Shanghai before the Second World War. Some of their doctrine is specific to the conditions found in Shanghai at the time , but much is universally applicable. Fleming would have been taught the doctrine of Fairbairn & Sykes at Camp X-Ray during his SOE training. Certainly he would have recognised that speed of drawstroke is important in self-defense. Doctrine relating to use of the pistol in self-defense would at that time been a highly esoteric subject known to only a few in either professional or amateur circles. Even to this day, while being more widespread knowledge of doctrine is confined to a minority. However, not only did Fleming know of the doctrine developed by Fairbairn & Sykes but he had extensive training at Camp X-Ray, which would have placed him in the front rank of pistol users during those decades.

- - Published doctrine had very little do with how policemen and members of the armed forces actually employ their pistols. Faibairn & Skyes text would have been obscure to all but the most diligent and well-researched of firearms practitioners. Most policemen and members of the armed forces would have had little or no training, even safety training. Firearms training of any kind did not really become common in the armed forces or police until the 1980s. Far more influence on pistol deployment than an obscure doctrine would be what was visible in the cinema and in the later part of the 1950s, on television. The almost universal prevalence of Westerns at the movies and on television meant that everyone observed pistol shooting in a style known as 'point-shooting' where the shot is made from the hip without using the sights. The fact that it was very difficult to hit anything like this would be lost on the audience and the actors. Fairbairn & Skyes train their undercover detectives to shoot from the hip because their training focuses on shooting an adversary which is at the most three yards away in a confined space where sight may be obscured. Most adversaries would be closer, at contact distance. With an adversary this close the danger is that the encounter beecomes a grappling match and the policeman will be unable to bring his pistol to bear upon his assailant. If the policeman brings his pistol up to his sightline and in doing so extends it forward then the pistol may be knocked out of the way. The policeman may well have to make the shot with the pistol held close to the hip in order to keep the pistol as far away from his assailant as possible. I know pistoleros who have had to take a shot with the pistol still in the holster, it was that close.

- - In Shanghai Faibairn & Skyes regular policemen receive training which uses a completed drawstroke followed by use of the sights on the pistol. The reason is that you have a much better chance of hitting your target in this manner. The main problem for the undercover detectives is that they may well have time to use the sights in some instances but if they miss some of the very close shots at contact distance they will not live long enough to take that second, aimed, shot.

'Shooting to Live' by Fairbairn and Sykes 1942
Shooting to Live by Fairbairn and Sykes , 1942

 

'Shooting to Live' by Fairbairn and Sykes 1942
Shooting to Live by Fairbairn and Sykes , 1942

 

'Shooting to Live' by Fairbairn and Sykes 1942
Shooting to Live by Fairbairn and Sykes , 1942

 

 

 

Visible in the Movies

Published Doctrine

 

 

 

1930s

James Cagney Wikipedia - in the movies uses hip shooting / point-shooting. No particular reason for this.

 

 

 

 

1938

 

Fast Fancy Revolver Shooting by Ed McGivern Wikipedia - 1938

1942

 

Shooting to Live by Fairbairn & Sykes Wikipedia - 1942

1950s

Cowboy hip shooting / point-shooting Wikipedia -
   
   

 

1953

Casino Royale (1953) written by Ian Fleming

 

 

 

 

1958

 

The two-handed Weaver Stance Wikipedia - is invented by Jack Weaver Wikipedia - which he uses to win the 1958 SWCPL Wikipedia - trophy at Big Bear.

1965

 

No Second Place Winner by Bill Jordan Wikipedia - 1965

1976

 

The Modern TechniqueWikipedia - - Invented by SWCPL Wikipedia - champion Colonel Jeff Cooper Wikipedia - whom developed the entire doctrine and began to teach it at Gunsite Ranch, AZ.

1970s

Two-handed shooting starts to appear in cop movies (The Dirty Harry series, Starsky & Hutch, et cetera)

 

1980s

Isoceles stance used by cinematographers because it does not obscure the face of the actor

The Isoceles Stance Wikipedia - - Evolved as a result of the use of low-recoil competition-only guns in IPSC Wikipedia - shooting.

 

 

 

1998

 

Bullseyes Don't Shoot Back - The Complete Textbook of Point Shooting by Rex Appelgate Wikipedia - Rex Applegate

 

- With reference to the above table, the pistol handling techniques used in motion pictures have an influence on the techniques and styles used by ordinary people which is tens of thousands of times more influential than any of the published doctrines developed by practitioners of self-defense. In motion pictures, actors would just shoot in any style they saw fit. Frequently, the cameraman would ask that the actor adopts a specific pose in order that he could compose the frame in the most visually solicitous manner. Prior to the publication of Fast Fancy Revolver Shooting by Ed McGivern 1938 there were no texts on shooting pistols. Many men must have been a good shot with a pistol, but they taught themselves by trial and error.

 

+ DRAWSTROKE - ON SCREEN

- Drawstroke on screen is governed more by the what the director and camerman would like to see in the frame than by the established doctrine in the use of the handgun. The cameraman will want the actor in the frame posed in a specific way, and with the pistol not obscuring his face, regardless of what is or is not correct doctrine for pistol use. Up until the 1980s, point-shooting (from the hip) was almost universally prevalent in movies, which was ideal from the cameraman's point of view. You can see the cameraman driving a scene with a pistol in it when Bond follows Quarrel into the backroom at Pussfeller's bar. Bond holds Quarrel and Pussfeller at gunpoint. The director/camerman pose Bond magnificently, with Bond holding his pistol at the hip. Notice that as Bond backs toward the door, his pistol changes from his right hand, which he has used to draw his pistol, to his left hand, which is necessary for the camera to capture Bond's upper torso and face without being obscured by his extended right hand.

- On screen nearly everything you see involving firearms use is wrong and this has helped policemen and the armed forces greatly because terrorists and criminals emulate what they see on screen. If you do understand firearms use, keep it to yourself, do not go around loudly correcting errors you see on screen. #

Dr No (1962) 00:28:58 the scene in Pussfeller's backroom
Cinematic Magnificence: Pussfeller's backroom: Bond holds Quarrel and Pussfeller at gunpoint. He has drawn his Walther PP with his right hand

 

Dr No (1962) 00:29:06 the scene in Pussfeller's backroom
Pussfeller's backroom: Bond holds Quarrel and Pussfeller at gunpoint now using his left hand.

He has drawn his Walther PP with his right hand but now in backing away toward the door he holds the Walther PP in his left hand. Felix Leiter will enter behind him and the cameraman/director need Bond's upper torso and face turning slightly toward the camera without being obscured by the movement of his pistol. Note the 'Red Stripe' beer cases in the background.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

+ THE SCREEN FIREARMS

From the script of Dr No (1962), James Bond has been summoned into M's office in order to be briefed on his mission and issued with a new pistol:


   
   M: Take off your jacket. Give me your gun. Yes, I thought so. This damn Beretta again. I've told you about this before. You tell him - for the last time.
   
   ARMOURER: Nice and light - in a lady's handbag. No stopping power. Any comments, 007?
   
   JAMES BOND: I disagree, sir. I've used a Beretta for ten years. I've never missed with it yet.
   
   M: Maybe not, but it jammed on your last job and you spent six months in hospital. A double-O number means you're licensed to kill, not get killed. And another thing. Since I've been head of Ml6, there's been a 40% drop in double-O casualties. I want it to stay that way. You'll carry the Walther. Unless you'd prefer to go back to standard intelligence duties?
   
   JAMES BOND: No, sir. I would not.
   
   M: Then from now on you carry a different gun. Show him, armourer.
   
   ARMOURER: Walther PPK. 7.65mm with a delivery like a brick through a plate-glass window. Takes a Brausch silencer, with little reduction in muzzle velocity. The American CIA swear by them.
   
   M: Thank you, Major Boothroyd. Thank you, sir. Any questions, 007?
   
   JAMES BOND: No, sir.
   
   M: All right, then. Best of luck.
   
   JAMES BOND: Thank you, sir.
   


 

- Specialist prop companies supply motion picture production companies with firearms and Cinema Retro Wikipedia - Cinema Retro Link - Cinema Retro Magazine Link - Cinema Retro Twitter Feed report that in the case of Dr No (1962) the prop company was Bapty & Co. You will have noticed that the Beretta carried by Sean Connery into M's office was a Beretta M1934. Furthermore the Walther was a Walther PP and not a Walther PPK as specified in Fleming's novel.

-- In the case of the Beretta, it may have been that Bapty & Co did not own a Beretta in .25 Auto, but did own the much more common Beretta M1934. This suits me fine as the Beretta M1934 would have been my personal choice for arming Bond.

-- In the case of the Walther, it have been that Bapty & Co did not own a Walther PPK and so supplied a Walther PP instead. The budget for props was not large and the props buyer Ronald Quelch may have more important things on his mind, as would the producers. No one would have imagined at this time that Dr No (1962) would have been the success that it was, nor the start of the world's biggest motion picture series, and thus studied in fine detail by the men like us.

Walther PP used by Sean Connery in Dr No (1962) issued by Bapty Firearms
Walther PP used by Sean Connery in Dr No (1962) issued by Bapty & Co

 

Walther PP used by Sean Connery in Dr No (1962) issued by Bapty & Co
Walther PP used by Sean Connery in Dr No (1962) issued by Bapty & Co

 

 

Novel/Motion Picture

Bond's Armament

 

 

 

1953

Casino Royale (1953)

Bond carries an unspecified 'Beretta' in .25ACP

 

 

 

1958

Dr No (1958)

Bond issued with Walther PPK

 

 

 

1962

Dr No (1962)

Bond enters carrying Beretta M1934 on screen

1962

 

Bond issued with Walther PP on screen

1962

 

Bond uses an FN Browning M1910 on screen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

+ THE SCREEN HOLSTERS

- Bond's shoulder holster in Dr No (1962) appears in four scenes:

-- The Office of M

-- The hôtel room

-- Pussfeller's Bar

-- Miss Taro's Bungalow

 

 

-- The Office of M:

Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster

 

-- The hôtel room

Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster

 

-- Pussfeller's Bar

Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster

 

-- The Assassination of Professor Dent.

Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster Dr No (1962) James Bond's shoulder holster

 

 

 

 

Bond's shoulder holster as it appears in four scenes in Dr No (1962)

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:12:15 Bond removes the coat jacket of his Black Tie evening dress revealing the blue strap of his shoulder holster.

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:13:08 The light colored leather of Bond's holster is visible. There appears to be a tab at the lowermost point of the holster which can be fixed to the button on his trouser band.

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:24:48 The Hôtel room in Jamaica.

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:24:48 The Hôtel room in Jamaica: The loadbearing strap on Bond's left shoulder is visible together with the alignment strap which threads around Bond's right shoulder.

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:24:49 The Hôtel room in Jamaica: The extension tab on the lowermost section of the holster is visible.

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:24:49 The Hôtel room in Jamaica: Bond places his right arm through the alignment strap.

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:24:50

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:24:51 The extension tab at the lowermost part of the holster hangs next to the waistband of Bond's trousers. The holster appears to have been made especially to fit Bond. Your tailor will normally ask if you wear a wrist-watch in order to accommodate it under your left sleeve, so, having one's holster maker match the holster to one's suits would seem to be natural in a good holster maker. The tailor who made suits for Sean Connery was director Terence Young's tailor, Anthony Sinclair and he stated in the documentary that he adjusted the cut of Connery's coat jacket to allow for the shoulder holster.

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:24:51 A close-up of Bond's holster

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:29:35 at the back room in Pussfeller's Bar: Felix Leiter holds Bond at gunpoint while Quarrel frisks Bond.

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:53:58: At Miss Taro's Bungalow (studio) Bond removes his coat jacket while he prepares to receive Professor Dent.

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:54:18 The rear of Bond's holster with its alignment strap is visible as he walks through the door.

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:54:18: The load-bearing strap of the shoulder holster is visible

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:54:22

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:55:41 Bond's shoulder holster with its extension tab fixed to the button on his trouser waistband is visible.

 

Article from Concealed Carry Handguns 2009 by Dennis Adler with contributions by holster-maker Jim Lockwood www.legendsinleather.com

Concealed Carry Magazine 2009 'The Guns of James Bond'
#

 

Concealed Carry Magazine 2009 'The Guns of James Bond'
The article states 'in his World War II under-cover work Fleming actually carried a .25ACP Beretta Model 418 just like James Bond in the early books'. However, this is incorrect on two counts. (1) Fleming did not carry a Beretta of any kind during the war, he carried a Browning in .25ACP. (2) In the first five novels James Bond carried an un-named 'Beretta', in .25ACP. The model of Beretta was unspecified.

 

Concealed Carry Magazine 2009 'The Guns of James Bond'
The article states in column 1 'when MI6 replaced Bond's Amherst-Villiers supercharged Bentley with an Aston Martin DB5 in Goldfinger, he stashed the big Colt .45 in a hidden compartment under the driver's seat.' This is factually incorrect because in the novel Goldfinger (1959) Bond drives an Aston Martin DB mkiii referred to by Fleming as an DBIII . In Goldfinger (1964) Bond is issued with an Aston Martin DB5, which we presume replaces his Bentley, which we glimpse in From Russia with Love (1963).

 

Concealed Carry Magazine 2009 'The Guns of James Bond'
#

The article states page 34 column 3 / page 35 column 1:


    The Goldfinger [(1964)] shoulder holster was constructed from two layers of dark blue suede with the single ply pouch made of from a natural color piece of the same material. Lockwood's research of the movies, using frame-by-frame and stop action, revealed that Bond's holster did not have any obvious shoulder strap adjustment and was sewn to the holster. The narrow across the back strap is single ply blue suede. "It was likely tailored to fit Sean Connery and made for the movie." says Lockwood. "The holster is also much bigger than is necessary and looks like it will accommodate a Browning Hi-Power or a Walther P-38. The fact that it would, and does accommodate a Walther P-38 is more than a little convenient, as in the nightime chase scene in Goldfinger Bond emerges from the Aston Martin not with a PPK but a Walther P-38. "The holster's belt attachment is also a mystery." says Lockwood "It is made of natural suede like the pouch, and is seldom if ever is used, as Bond practically never wore a belt. Tux trousers don't have one."


 

Dr No (1962) 00:24:11 the scene in the hotel room
Sean Connery's suit has been cut by Anthony Sinclair in a manner which accommodates a shoulder holster

Sinclair could have cut Connery's suit in a tightly waisted manner like an RAF tunic, but this would have revealed the bulge of the shoulder holster under Connery's left arm. Sinclair has cut the coat jacket in such a way that it does not fit tightly around the under-arm area of the torso but is not hanging loose by the time it reaches the waist. Cutting looks simple until you try it.

 

 

 

 

Scene: Bond arrives at the airport
Location: Palisadoes Airport, Kingston, Jamaica.

- Cinema Retro Wikipedia - Cinema Retro Link - Cinema Retro Magazine Link - Cinema Retro Twitter Feed report that Bond's Trilby was a model called Sandown which was purchased from James Lock Wikipedia - James Lock the hatters in London.

 

- Felix Leiter waits for James Bond at the airport. Leiter is wearing dark sunglasses to reduce the risk of being recognised. Cold War head of West German intelligence Reinhard Gehlen was so guarded about his identity that he wore dark sunglasses at all times. His identity was such a closely guarded secret that he once received a report on his desk from one of his agents who was travelling in a railway train compartment and had overheard a discussion between two other passengers which centered around what the identity of the head of West German intelligence might be. What the agent did not realise was that sitting in the same railway carriage compartment was the head of West German intelligence, Reinhard Gehlen, who had overheard every word.

-- Dark glasses are almost a comic stereotype in the spy world, but the brain's pattern recognition uses the distance between the eye-sockets and other dimensional information around the eyes to perform the pattern recognition necessary to recognise another face. Dark glasses prevent this. Computer software used to analyse faces and recognises them also use these features. Dark glasses prevent that from working.

Dr No (1962) Jamaica - Bond's arrival at Palisadoes Airport
Bond carries his Q-branch issue Swaine Adeney briefcase through arrivals to the taxi rank.

 

Dr No (1962) Jamaica - Bond's arrival at Palisadoes Airport - The stewardess carries an early BOAC overnight bag

 

Dr No (1962) Jamaica - Bond's arrival at Palisadoes Airport - the driver opens the door of the Chevrolet Bel-Air

 

Dr No (1962) Jamaica - Bond's arrival at Palisadoes Airport

 

Dr No (1962) Jamaica - Bond's arrival at Palisadoes Airport

 

Dr No (1962) Jamaica - Bond's arrival at Palisadoes Airport

 

Scene: Bond is driven from the airport by a chauffeur
Location: Norman Manley Highway between the airport and Port Royal.

Sean Connery rides in the rear of a Chevrolet Belair along the Norman Manley Highway
00:19:02 James Bond is taken for a ride by one of Dr No's henchmen 'Mr Jones from Government House'.
Looks like coming up for 17:00HRS.

 

 

 

Scene: Bond returns to government house with the dead body of the agent.
Location: King's House, West King's House Road, Kingston.

- The sergeant may well have been a sergeant in real life as he snaps a smart salute in classic British Army longest-way-up-shortest-way-down style.

 

Scene: 00:23:47 At the hôtel.
Location: Pinewood Studios

00:23:47 The hôtel waiter states: "One medium-dry vodka-martini, mixed like you said sir and not stirred."

 

Dr No (1962) Pinewood Studios hotel room - Bond's Q branch issue briefcase
Bond's briefcase is visible on the top of the dresser

 

Dr No (1962) Pinewood Studios hotel room - Bond's Q branch issue briefcase

 

Dr No (1962) Pinewood Studios hotel room - Bond's Q branch issue briefcase

 

Dr No (1962) Pinewood Studios hotel room - Bond's Q branch issue briefcase
Close-up of the brass catches on Bond's Q-branch issue briefcase. The case is clearly an over-lapping clamshell design.

 

Brass catches used by Swaine Adeney Brigg, Barrow & Hepburn, Tanner Krolle
Comparison of the brass catches used on (left to right) Connery's case from Dr No (1962), Barrow & Hepburn, Tanner Krolle. Connery's case was likely made by Swaine Adeney Brigg, as was the case in From Russia with Love (1963).

 

Scene: The Nightclub at Pussfeller's Bar
Location: Morgan Harbour Bar, Port Royale

- If you have ever watched Dr No (1962) and wondered who the dancer was who is going wild, then Cinema Retro Wikipedia - Cinema Retro Link - Cinema Retro Magazine Link - Cinema Retro Twitter Feed have identified him and interviewed him: It was Count Prince Miller Wikipedia - Link - who was in fact the biggest entertainer in Jamaica at that time.

- The scene in the store-room of the club was shot on a constructed set nearby.

 

- Two years later, in 1964, Ian Fleming would be dead, but one year later Ian Fleming mentions Morgan's Harbour in his posthumously published novel The Man with the Golden Gun (1965):

James Bond is speaking on the telephone to Mary Goodnight, secretary of Commander Ross:


    "First I need a car. Anything that'll go. Then I want the name of the top man at Frome, you know, the WISCO estate beyond Savannah La Mar. Large-scale survey map of that area, a hundred pounds in Jamaican money. Then be an angel and ring up Alexander's the auctioneers and find out anything you can about a property that's advertised in today's Gleaner. Say you're a prospective buyer. Three-and-a-half Love Lane. You'll see the details. Then I want you to come out to Morgan's Harbour where I'm going in a minute, be staying the night there, and we'll have dinner and swop secrets until the dawn steals over the Blue Mountains. Can do?"

"Of course. But that's a hell of a lot of secrets. What shall I wear?"

"Something that's tight in the right places. Not too many buttons."

She laughed. "You've established your identity. Now I'll get on with all this. See you about seven. 'Bye."

Gasping for air, James Bond pushed his way out of the little sweatbox. He ran his handkerchief over his face and neck. He'd be damned! Mary Goodnight, his darling secretary from the old days in the Double-O Section! At Headquarters they had said she was abroad. He hadn't asked any questions. Perhaps she had opted for a change when he had gone missing. Anyway, what a break! Now he'd got an ally, someone he knew. Good old Gleaner! He got his bag from the Aeronaves de Mexico booth and went out and hailed a taxi and said "Morgan's Harbour" and sat back and let the air from the open windows begin to dry him.

The romantic little hôtel is on the site of Port Royal at the tip of the Palisadoes. The proprietor, an Englishman who had once been in Intelligence himself and who guessed what Bond's job was, was glad to see him. He showed Bond to a comfortable air-conditioned room with a view of the pool and the wide mirror of Kingston Harbour. He said, "What is it this time? Cubans or smuggling? They're the popular targets these days."


 

 

 

Scene: Professor Dent makes a day-time visit to Crab Key
Location:

Anthony Dawson in "They were not Divided" (1950)
Anthony Dawson in They were not Divided (1950). The film was directed by Terence Young and when Young came to cast Dr No (1962) he brought in Dawson.

 

 

Scene: Bond receives an unwelcome nocturnal visit from a spider
Location: Pinewood Studios

- Bond is wearing his dark suit when he enters the hôtel lobby and returns to his room.

- The unlucky Bob Simmons doubled for Sean Connery where possible in this scene. You can see Bob Simmons' bicep in several of the frames. The oval mark upon area between his bicep and tricep is the result of an immunisation injection which was given to children born in England from the 1940s through to the 1960s. In the frames immediately afterwards, showing Sean Connery it is just possible to see that a glass screen has been placed right next to Connery's shoulder and the spider is crawling up the glass, even though it looks like it is crawling up Connery's deltoid.

 

Scene:
Location:

 

 

Scene: 00:45:00 James Bond inspects Quarrel's boat with a Geiger counter Wikipedia - Geiger Counter. (00:45:00)
Location: Morgan's Harbour

James Bond inspects Quarrel's boat with a Geiger counter
00:45:00 James Bond inspects Quarrel's boat with a Geiger counter and tests the counter by waving it over his Rolex Submariner watch.

 

Dr No (1962) Sean Connery offers a cigarette to Felix Lieter from his black oxidized cigarette case by Dunhill
Dr No (1962) Sean Connery offers a cigarette to Felix Leiter from his black oxidized cigarette case by Dunhill. Note that Bond is not wearing his shoulder holster for this scene.

Note that there are no fancy suit linings for James Bond. Anthony Sinclair has used a subtly contrasting lining cloth for Sean Connery's suit. In general the best quality tailors eschew fancy linings but will indulge insistent clients. Fancy linings are not easy to view en-masse but perhaps the tailor with the best selection of fancy linings on Saville Row is Geives and Hawkes.

 

Dr No (1962) Sean Connery offers a cigarette to Felix Lieter from his black oxidized cigarette case by Dunhill
00:46:17

 

Dr No (1962) Sean Connery offers a cigarette to Felix Lieter from his black oxidized cigarette case by Dunhill
00:46:17 In Sean Connery's hand you can see the black oxidized finish of the cigarette case

 

Dr No (1962) Sean Connery offers a cigarette to Felix Lieter from his black oxidized cigarette case by Dunhill
00:46:17

 

Dr No (1962) Sean Connery offers a cigarette to Felix Lieter from his black oxidized cigarette case by Dunhill
00:46:17 The smooth finish of the black oxide catches the sunlight and reflects strongly. Lucky that Bond is not under observation by an enemy sniper.

 

Dr No (1962) Sean Connery offers a cigarette to Felix Lieter from his black oxidized cigarette case by Dunhill
00:46:19 James Bond flips open the cigarette case and offers Felix Leiter a cigarette.

In James Bond - The Legacy by John Cork and Bruce Scivally published by Boxtree 2002, Cork&Scivally report that Felix Leiter was named after an American friend of Fleming's whom had the surname Leiter. It was in fact his wife, Marion Leiter whom Senator John F. Kennedy had telephoned during an illness to see if she had anything she could read. She gave him some of Fleming's novels.

 

Dr No (1962) Sean Connery offers a cigarette to Felix Lieter from his black oxidized cigarette case by Dunhill
00:46:20 In Quarrel's right hand you can see James Bond's Rolex Submariner, which Bond has removed from his wrist while he uses the Geiger counter.

 

Dr No (1962) Sean Connery offers a cigarette to Felix Lieter from his black oxidized cigarette case by Dunhill
00:46:20

 

Dr No (1962) Sean Connery offers a cigarette to Felix Lieter from his black oxidized cigarette case by Dunhill
00:46:21

 

Dr No (1962) Sean Connery offers a cigarette to Felix Lieter from his black oxidized cigarette case by Dunhill
00:46:23 In Quarrel's hand you can see the Rolex Submariner. The strap appears to be black/brown.

 

Dr No (1962) Sean Connery offers a cigarette to Felix Lieter from his black oxidized cigarette case by Dunhill
00:46:26 The Rolex Submariner is now in Bond's right hand.

 

Panel showing Bond's black oxidized cigarette case by Dunhill
00:46:16: Bond's black oxidized cigarette case by Dunhill. Sean Connery removes it from this jacket [US: 'coat'] pocket. The black case turns in his hand and reflects the sunlight (see the shadow of Quarrel's hat). Sean Connery opens the case and offers one of the cigarettes to Felix Leiter (Jack Lord). Ian Fleming's cigarette holder (the short one) was from Dunhill.

In Ian Fleming's first James Bond novel Casino Royale (1953) page 47.9 (Pan edition):


   With the thin vertical scar down his right cheek the general effect was faintly piratical. Not much of Hoagy Carmichael there, thought Bond, as he filled a flat, light gunmetal box with fifty of the Morland cigarettes with the triple gold band. Mathis had told him of the girl's comment.
   He slipped the case into his hip pocket and snapped his oxidized Ronson Wikipedia - Ronson to see if it needed fuel.


 

From Ian Fleming's novel Moonraker (1955)


   Bond took out his, black gunmetal cigarette-box and his black-oxidized Ronson Wikipedia - Ronson lighter and put them on the desk beside him. He lit a cigarette, one of the Macedonian blend with the three gold rings round the butt that Morlands of Grosvenor Street made for him, then he settled himself forward in the padded swivel chair and began to read.


 

In fact Fleming himself owned a black oxidized cigarette case - which was made from solid gold. It had been a present from a lover and Fleming used this cigarette case for the rest of his life. Someone has that cigarette case and may not know of its significance or value.

Dr No 1962 Jamaica Morgans Harbour Sean Connery wears a Prince of Wales check suit by Anthony Sinclair a black knitted tie and holds a gold black oxide finish Dunhill cigarette case
A production still: Morgan's Harbour: Sean Connery wears a Prince of Wales check suit by Anthony Sinclair a black knitted tie and holds a black oxide finish Dunhill cigarette case. The resolution of most transfers from Technicolor 35mm through to DVD is not great and Connery's suit looks to be flat gray but in fact it was a Prince of Wales check. The narrow black knitted tie as specified by Fleming is clearly visible.

 

From Fleming's novel Dr No (1958):


   Bond ordered a double gin and tonic and one whole green lime. When the drink came he cut the lime in half, dropped the two squeezed halves into the long glass, almost filled the glass with ice cubes and then poured in the tonic. He took the drink out on to the balcony, and sat and looked out across the spectacular view. He thought how wonderful it was to be away from headquarters, and from London, and from hospitals, and to be here, at this moment, doing what he was doing and knowing, as all his senses told him, that he was on a good tough case again.
He sat for a while, luxuriously, letting the gin relax him. He ordered another and drank it down. It was seven-fifteen. He had arranged for Quarrel to pick him up at seven-thirty. They were going to have dinner together. Bond had asked Quarrel to suggest a place. After a moment of embarrassment, Quarrel had said that whenever he wanted to enjoy himself in Kingston he went to a waterfront nightspot called the Joy Boat. "Hit no great shakes, cap'n," he had said apologetically, "but da food an' drinks an" music is good and I got a good fren' dere. Him owns de joint. Dey calls him 'Pus-Feller' seein' how him once fought wit' a big hoctopus."
Bond smiled to himself at the way Quarrel, like most West Indians, added an 'h' where it wasn't needed and took it off when it was. He went into his room and dressed in his old dark blue tropical worsted suit, a sleeveless white cotton shirt and ablack knitted tie, looked in the glass to see that the Walther didn't show under his armpit and went down and out to where the car was waiting.


Fleming specifies Bond's neck-tie as 'black knitted'. This type of tie is thin and easy to tie in a small knot. It would look good on someone of Bond/Connery's height.

From Moonraker (1955) Fleming describes Bond's cigarette case and cigarette lighter:


   He shrugged his shoulders and resolutely opened the top folder. Inside there was a detailed map of southern Poland and north-eastern Germany. Its feature was a straggling red line connecting Warsaw and Berlin. There was also a long typewritten memorandum headed Mainline: A well-established Escape Route from East to West.
Bond took out his, black gunmetal cigarette-box and his black-oxidized Ronson lighter and put them on the desk beside him. He lit a cigarette, one of the Macedonian blend with the three gold rings round the butt that Morlands of Grosvenor Street made for him, then he settled himself forward in the padded swivel chair and began to read.


 

 

Scene: Bond in the Sunbeam Alpine
Location: Drives past Ochos Rios cement factory.

- One year later Ian Fleming mentions Strangways in Live and Let Die (1954) and mentions both the Sunbeam Alpine and Strangways in his novel The Man with the Golden Gun (1965):


   The direct blue eyes looked straight into his, dodging the compliment. "This is the stuff I live with here. It's built into the Station. But I thought you might like some background to Frome, and what I've said explains why WISCO are getting these cane fires. At least we think it is. She took a sip of her drink. "Well, that's all about sugar. The car's outside. You remember Strangways? Well, it's his old Sunbeam Alpine. The Station bought it, and now I use it. It's a bit aged, but it's still pretty fast and it won't let you down. It's rather bashed about, so it won't be conspicuous. The tank's full, and I've put the survey map in the glove compartment."


 

 

 

Scene: 00:52:22
Location:

 

 

James Bond's Rolex Submariner
00:52:22 Bond wears his Rolex Submariner in bed

Dr No (1962) Sean Connery in bed with Zena Marshall
Probably our best shot of the Rolex: Sean Connery in bed with Zena Marshall. Sadly the Rolex is in shadow and the focus is elsewhere.

Sean Connery and Zena Marshall in bed
Sean Connery and Zena Marshall in bed.

 

Sean Connery and Zena Marshall in bed

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scene: 00:53:36 Bond lies in wait for Dent
Location: Ochos Rios, Couples Sans Souci resort.

 

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:53:36 Bond pours himself a vodka next to the record player

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster

 

Sean Connery pours some Vodka

James Bond's Rolex Submariner
Bond fixes the silencer to his FN Browning M1910 pistol while he waits for Dent

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
00:55:20 Professor Dent makes his entrance

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster

 

James Bond's Rolex Submariner
"That's a Smith&Wesson ...and you have had your six"
Bond wields an FN Browning M1910 Wikipedia - Wikipedia - IMFDB FN Browning M1910

 

Cinema Retro Wikipedia - Cinema Retro Link - Cinema Retro Magazine Link - Cinema Retro Twitter Feed report that (page 35) one of their contributors, Robin Harbour, had a conversation with Geoffrey Boothroyd in the 1990s, and Geoffrey Boothroyd that told that the FN Model 1910 was used in the scene because, "it had proven track record of being fired with a silencer."

This is find difficult to believe. From where would the FN Model 1910 have obtained this 'track record'. It is far more likely that the FN in question had been modified by Bapty & Co for use with a silencer and the Walther PP which Sean Connery uses in Dr No (1962) had not. That being said Geoffrey Boothroyd was not a man prone to making up stories. Given the short time available to assemble the props and the small budget for the movie, it is unlikely that a Walther PP or PPK could be prepared for use with a silencer just for the movie. It is far more likely that Bapty & Co already had that particular pistol, the FN Model 1910, already equipped with a silencer. Geoffrey Boothroyd also stated that the FN Model 1910 was equipped with a real silencer in order to fire the two blank rounds which Bond fires into Professor Dent, but that the close-up scene where Bond removes the silencer was shot with a dummy silencer made of wood, which enabled Bond to pull out the silencer rather than unscrew it.

Furthermore, the script seems to have been written so that Professor Dent uses a Smith and Wesson revolver. Smith and Wesson did not make an automatic this time and would not for another twenty years. The line "That's a Smith&Wesson ...and you have had your six" indicates that they intended to use a Smith&Wesson revolver. It seems entirely likely that the props department were unable to source a silenced Walther PPK for Bond and a silenced Smith&Wesson revolver for Professor Dent.

- Professor Dent uses a Colt M1911 fitted with a suppressor. This is an excellent choice of pistol for use with a suppressor.

-- The .45ACP cartridge fires a round that is just subsonic (just below the sound barrier), which means there is no supersonic crack as the bullet breaks the sound barrier.

-- The .45ACP is as large a diameter bullet as it is practical to fire from a pistol and will provide a large wound-track which will incapacitate the recipient in the shortest possible time.

The Colt M1911 like all automatics with a slide poses architectural difficulties when it comes to fitting a silencer because the outside of the barrel must fit inside the slide, which means the silencer cannot be threaded onto the exterior of the barrel, as it could be with a revolver. This means that the silencer must be threaded into a rebated section of the interior of the end of the barrel. This means that you are adding a thread in a confined space, which can be done but not easily.

 

+ AND YOU'VE HAD YOUR SIX

-- "That's a Smith&Wesson. And you've had your six" is one of the great movie lines but the props manager has not done us any favors when he issued the pistols for this scene.

(1) It's a Colt

(2) There were no automatics which have only a six round magazine at that time. #

(3) If you have an automatic with a six round magazine, there is nothing to stop the user from feeding one round into the chamber and adding another to the magazine, so the pistol is now 6+1 and will fire seven rounds. No way of know if he has done this by looking from the outside. The Colt M1911 is 7+1, although there are eight round magazines available in the last twenty years which would make it an 8+1. Para-Ordnance Wikipedia - Para Ordnance make a Colt M1911 that has a double-stack magazine which makes it 13+1 in .45 ACP.

(4) Professor Dent does lock the slide back on the Colt, which happens when the magazine is empty and the magazine follower rises in front of the bolt to stop it going forward. Bond can see that the pistol is empty.

(5) Professor Dent manages to skilfully pick up the empty pistol but the pistol is empty and a Colt M1911 in this condition will not even drop the hammer when the trigger is pulled. Even if Professor Dent released the slide the bolt, it would close on a empty chamber, and in that case would go 'click'.

The script would have matched the props if a revolver had been used. There would be only six rounds in the cylinder, or sometimes five rounds, for those revolvers where you have to keep an empty cylinder under the hammer to avoid a slam-fire.

 

+ SILENCERS

- Properly termed a suppressor. The suppressor works the same way an auto muffler does. If the discharge from an automobile cylinder or the discharge from the barrel of a gun is allowed to exit all at once it does so in a wave with a well-defined front that travels at the speed of sound, through the air. The human ear receives that wave all at once and hears a sharp crack. An auto muffler or a firearm suppressor is a large diameter tube which is fitted with baffles of some kind. The sudden pressure wave exits into the baffles and starts to break up as it rebounds off the baffles and the walls of the cylinder. Eventually the expanding gases make it to the exit of the suppressor and exit as a 'whoosh' rather than a 'crack'. The baffles can be any shape because all they have to do is make the pressure wave trip over itself and cause the flow of gases to become turbulent rather than uniform. Turbulent gases cannot flow fast and hence the 'whoosh' noise.

There is no reduction in the muzzle velocity of the bullet. It has left both barrel and chamber by the time the action starts with the gases

If the bullet leaving the barrel is supersonic (nearly all rifle rounds are and most pistol rounds too) then the bullet will trail a supersonic shock-wave behind it like a supersonic fighter aircraft. In supersonic aircraft the shock-wave is heard as a distant clap of thunder but in a bullet it is heard as a 'crack'. It is a much smaller noise than the shock-wave of high velocity gases which leave the barrel and is not distinguishable until the firearm is fitted with a suppressor. In a pistol round I doubt it would disturb any one in the next room. In terms of being discrete, this noise level is acceptable. However, if you were shooting at someone in a crowded place like a cafe, then enough people might notice it that it would give away the position of the firer. If the bullet is subsonic then there is no sonic boom. The pistol makes no noise whatsoever.

There is, however, the issue of 'first round pop'. This is an effect caused by the burnt propellent gases filling the body of suppressor which contains air. Many of the propellant by-products are flammable in air but there is insufficient oxygen in the propellent as it burns to allow them to combust. Once they meet air, they are ignited by the flash. They mix with air and burn rapidly within the suppressor barrel, making a 'pop' noise as they exit the suppressor barrel.

The second round fired will not make the 'pop' because there is no air left in the cylinder of the suppressor to mix with the combustion products and burn. By the time the combustion products are outside beyond the cylinder, they are cool enough not to combust and the flash from the end of the gunbarrel is is burned out within the suppressor cylinder.

The nature of the work undertaken means that we require the first round to be as silent as possible. The fact that the second round is silent is of little comfort to us.

To achieve silence on the first round, you need to cover the inside of the suppressor cylinder with grease or oil or both. Then when the burning combustion products enter the suppressor cylinder the heat is enough that the oil and grease burn in the existing air/oxygen within the suppressor cylinder and do not exit the suppressor cylinder and combust there, making the 'pop'. This is called a 'wet' suppressor, rather than a 'dry' suppressor. I have use a suppressed Colt M1911 which fires a subsonic round and was equipped with a wet suppressor. There was neither the crack of the super-sonic bullet nor the first round 'pop' of the dry suppressor. It really was 'silent'. This is the ideal of suppressed pistols.

 

+ HI-STANDARD model HD Wikipedia - Hi-Standard HD .22LR pistol and HDM Wikipedia - Hi-Standard HDM

- If you deal with suppressed pistols you will come across the use of .22LR as a pistol round for use in suppressed pistols. The .22LR is just super-sonic and so will generate a sonic-boom or sonic-crack as it is in firearms but the small quantity of combustion gases which it generates means that it is quite discrete when used as a pistol in assassinations. In a situation where the assassin chooses his moment, then usually he would chose a head-shot, which is far more effective than a shot to the torso. The .22LR is fine in this capacity because any bullet which reaches the brain will almost certainly kill you. One of the pistols which used to be very popular in this capacity was the Hi-Standard HD Wikipedia - Hi-Standard HD .22LR pistol and HDM Wikipedia - Hi-Standard HDM . The pistol's form and function was exactly that of a Colt M1911 which meant that if the user was already the user of a Colt M1911 as his every-day carry gun then the Hi-Standard HD Wikipedia - Hi-Standard HD .22LR pistol felt instantly familiar in use. The Hi-Standard HDM Wikipedia - Hi-Standard HDM was developed by the OSS during WWII and differed from the HD in that it had an integral supressor. The ordinary Hi-Standard HD Wikipedia - Hi-Standard HD .22LR pistol , fitted with a suppressor, was popular among Mafia hit-men from its inception until it became uncommon in the 1990s. A supressor is no more sophisticated that an straight-through auto muffler and so they are easy to manufacture using hobbyist machinery or even handtools. After each assassination, the pistol used in the hit would be destroyed, which must have used up a lot of nice pistols.

Hi-Standard HD .22LR pistol exploded parts diagram
Hi-Standard HD exploded parts diagram

 

Cartridges of the World by Frank C. Barnes 3rd Edition published by DBI Books, 1976, first published 1965 page 274 section 22LR Long Rifle rimfire
Cartridges of the World by Frank C. Barnes 3rd Edition published by DBI Books, 1976, first published 1965 , page 274, section .22LR

 

- Arms designer Gerald Bull was assassinated by a Mossad hit-squad in the lobby outside his apartment in Brussels with five shots to the head using a silenced .22LR. The type of pistol was not known. #

- You may be wondering how this data was compiled. Did someone stand up at the annual convention of Mafia hit-men in Las Vegas and ask them to fill out a questionnaire ? No. In the case of the Hi-Standard it was anecdotal knowledge built up by the police departments. In the case of Gerald Bull it was the autopsy which revealed the caliber of the round used. #

- Remember that the 'Mafia hit-man' is largely a figment of screen-plays. There are one or two who make a long and successful career out of being enforcers but like most people involved in organised, violent, crime they lead short violent lives. There is a high rate of attrition. This does not leave them a long time to determine the best methods of assassination nor is there an established doctrine for assassins nor a night-school to teach it. Similarly in intelligence and espionage. During the war, there were organisations with the same remit as the regular army 'kill people and break things'. But in peace time there is no such unit nor is the expertise available. SOE training during WWII was handled by drawing on the few men in the British Empire with sufficient experience: Men like # Fairbairn and Sykes who had learned their trade in Shanghai where there were plenty of encounters with dangerous violent gangsters which enabled them to develope a doctrine from that which did not work in real life and that which did. In the peacetime of the Cold-War, these sorts of men were just not available. Those working in the intelligence services were just civil servants, without so much as a school-yard scrap to their name. In the Cold War of the 1950s, the Warsaw Pact intelligence and espionage services, who did have assassinations to perform, would use expendable individuals such as convicted criminals. Lack of experience and the 'Fog of War' meant that things would go wrong. Markus Wolf stated that may of the early kidnaps in the 1950s would go wrong because the drugs administered to knock-out the victims were administered wrongly, and killed them. James Bond was a product of WWII with men like Fleming's 30AU and other units such as the SOE. . There was plenty of opportunity to learn the trade and plenty of men to learn it from. All that disappeared by the 1960s and the 'kill people and break things' remit of the intelligence and espionage organisations disappeared, leaving a vapid pencil-pushing intelligence gathering operation filled by men who had entered through the even more vapid Civil Service. As the Cold War draws into the 1960s Bond truly is an anachronism in this respect. Just the kind of man we needed.

- #

 

 

Scene: Miss Taro's bungalow
Location:

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
Bond opens his cigarette case

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
Professor Dent observes his silenced Colt M1911 lying on top of the duvet on the floor

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
Bond lights a Morland cigarette

 

 

 

Scene: 00:56:34 Felix Leiter and Quarrel wait for Bond .
Location: Morgan's Harbour.

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
Bond arrives at the harbor at night

 

Dr No (1962) Bond's shoulder holster
Bond and Leiter converse

 

 

 

Scene: Bond investigates Crab Key
Location: Laughing Water Estate, at the time of filming owned by Minnie Simpson.

- 'Crab Key' was based on Fleming's visit to the island of Inagua Wikipedia - Link - on 1956-MAR-15 . Inagua had a population of around a thousand natives and it's only industry was the export of salt. An old fisherman used to bring gold coins into the island's bank, which was the district commissioner's office. One year he ceased coming and it transpired that he had died, taking the secret of the location of the gold coins with him.

From The Man with the Golden Typewriter by Fergus Fleming:


   In April 1956 Fleming wrote a series of travel articles for the Sunday Times, one of which opened with a typically carpe diem sentiment: ‘After the age of forty, time begins to become important, and one is inclined to say, “Yes” to every experience.’ The experience he had in mind was an expedition to the Bahamian island of Inagua, organised by Ivar Bryce, to study the world’s largest population of flamingos. The birds were dramatic enough, but what really caught Fleming’s imagination was the 100-square-mile lake in which they lived – a shallow, mangrove-fringed expanse ‘the colour of a corpse’, which exuded a miasma of rotten-egg decay – and the secluded, semi-feudal life of Inagua’s 1,000-strong population. The only source of employment was a salt works, overseen by a European family who guarded their fiefdom with vigour. ‘It is a hideous island,’ he wrote, ‘and nobody in his senses ever goes near the place.’ The last time Inagua had been surveyed was 1916, since when it had dropped off the bureaucratic map. Could there be a better villain’s lair?


 


View Larger Map

Laughing Waters, on the north shore of Jamaica.

 

 

 

 

Scene: 00:59:56 Bond encounters Honey Ryder
Location: Laughing Waters, Jamaica

 

 

James Bond's Rolex Submariner
00:59:46 Bond awakes to hear Honey Ryder's singing. Bond awakening was shot in the studio.

Ian Fleming describes the moment in his novel Dr No (1958) Chapter VII The Elegant Venus:


   Bond awoke lazily. The feel of the sand reminded him where he was. He glanced at his watch. Ten o'clock. The sun through the round thick leaves of the sea-grape was already hot. A larger shadow moved across the dappled sand in front of his face. Quarrel? Bond shifted his head and peered through the fringe of leaves and grass that concealed him from the beach. He stiffened. His heart missed a beat and then began pounding so that he had to breathe deeply to quieten it. His eyes, as he stared through the blades of grass, were fierce slits.
    It was a naked girl, with her back to him. She was not quite naked. She wore a broad leather belt round her waist with a hunting knife in a leather sheath at her right hip. The belt made her nakedness extraordinarily erotic. She stood not more than five yards away on the tideline looking down at something in her hand. She stood in the classical relaxed pose of the nude, all the weight on the right leg and the left knee bent and turning slightly inwards, the head to one side as she examined the things in her hand.
    It was a beautiful back. The skin was a very light uniform café au lait with the sheen of dull satin. The gentle curve of the backbone was deeply indented, suggesting more powerful muscles than is usual in a woman, and the behind was almost as firm and rounded as a boy's. The legs were straight and beautiful and no pinkness showed under the slightly lifted left heel. She was not a coloured girl.
    Her hair was ash blonde. It was cut to the shoulders and hung there and along the side of her bent cheek in thick wet strands. A green diving mask was pushed back above her forehead, and the green rubber thong bound her hair at the back.
    The whole scene, the empty beach, the green and blue sea, the naked girl with the strands of fair hair, reminded Bond of something. He searched his mind. Yes, she was Botticelli's Venus, seen from behind.


 

- Ursula Andress's belt was a British Army '37 Pattern Wikipedia - 37 Pattern Webbing webbing belt. '37 Pattern was replaced with the greatly inferior '58 Pattern webbing Wikipedia - 58 Pattern Webbing kit, which was universally hated by all concerned. Not only was the webbing of inferior quality (soft and floppy) but the fittings were no longer brass, being made of cheap white metal finished with green paint.

- Ursula Andress's bikini was made locally by a designer especially for the movie using one of Ursula's under-wired brassieres for the top. Cinema Retro Wikipedia - Cinema Retro Link - Cinema Retro Magazine Link - Cinema Retro Twitter Feed in their special edition on Dr No manage to obtain an interview with Ursula Andress wherein she told that the details of how the material for the bikini was selected and how the bikini was constructed. The bikini was designed and made by Ursula and her friend the designer Tessa Prendergast.

- Powerful arc lights were used to light this outdoor scene as can be seen in some of the production stills found on page 86 of the Cinema Retro Wikipedia - Cinema Retro Link - Cinema Retro Magazine Link - Cinema Retro Twitter Feed in their special edition on Dr No (1962). The use of the arc lights in exterior locations can mean that it is difficult to distinguish between some outdoor scenes and back-projection.

- On page 23 of The James Bond Bedside Companion, Raymond Benson writes:


   Early in 1962 Dr No began production with locations in Jamaica, and Ian Fleming sat down at Goldeneye to write On Her Majesty's Secret Service.
   The first time Fleming visited the set of Dr No Terence Young was in the middle of shooting the scene in which Honeychile Rider (Ursula Andress) was coming out of the water onto the beach where Bond was hiding. Young's shot was ruined by four people walking down the beach towards the area. The four men hit the sand and the remainder of the scene was shot. Half an hour later, Young remembered the men on the beach and sent someone to look for them. The men turned out to be Ian Fleming Wikipedia - Link - , Noel Coward Wikipedia - Link - , Stephen Spender Wikipedia - Link - , the poet, and Peter Quennell Wikipedia - Link - , the author and critic.


 

Sean Connery and Ursula Andress at Laughing Waters

 

Sean Connery and Ursula Andress at Laughing Waters

 

Sean Connery and Ursula Andress at Laughing Waters, with a Scuba mask

 

Sean Connery and Ursula Andress at Laughing Waters

 

Sean Connery and Ursula Andress at Laughing Waters

 

Laughing Waters: Sean Connery holds Ursula Andress in a handstand
Laughing Waters: Sean Connery holds Ursula Andress in a handstand

 

Laughing Waters: Sean Connery demonstrates hand-stands for Ursula Andress
Laughing Waters: Sean Connery hand-stands while Ursula Andress looks on

 

Laughing Waters: Sean Connery in a straw sun hat
Laughing Waters: Sean Connery in a straw sun hat

 

Laughing Waters: Sean Connery converses with Ian Fleming
Laughing Waters: Sean Connery converses with Ian Fleming

 

Laughing Waters: Ian Fleming and Sean Connery converse
Laughing Waters: Ian Fleming and Sean Connery converse

 

Laughing Waters: Ian Fleming converses with Ursula Andress
Laughing Waters: Ian Fleming converses with Ursula Andress. Fleming mentions Red Stripe beer by name in his novel Dr No (1958)

 

Sean Connery signs a coconut shell for a small Jamaican girl
Sean Connery signs a coconut shell for a small Jamaican girl

 

Laughing Waters: Ursula Andress sunbathes topless with Sean Connery
Laughing Waters: Sean Connery and Ursula Andress sunbathe

 

Laughing Waters - Sean Connery and Ursula Andress
Laughing Waters: Sean Connery's Rolex Submariner is visible as well as Ursula Andress's '37 Pattern webbing belt and her float handled Scuba diving knife.

 

Laughing Waters - Sean Connery and Ursula Andress

 

'Dr No' (1962): Sean Connery's Rolex Submariner on a crocodile leather strap

 

Sean Connery and Ursula Andress at Laughing Waters, with a Conch shell and Scuba mask

 

Sean Connery and Ursula Andress at Laughing Waters
Laughing Waters: Sean Connery's Rolex Submariner

 

Dr No (1962) Ursula Andress sits in Sean Connery's lap during filming at Laughing Waters
Dr No (1962) Ursula Andress sits in Sean Connery's lap during filming at Laughing Waters

 

Sean Connery and Ursula Andress at Laughing Waters

 

Terence Young, Sean Connery and Ursula Andress review the script at Laughing Waters

 

Laughing Waters: Cubby Broccoli, John Kitzmiller, Sean Connery, Ursula Andress
Laughing Waters: Cubby Broccoli, John Kitzmiller, Sean Connery, Ursula Andress

 

Ursula Andress and Ian Fleming
Ursula Andress and Ian Fleming

 

Sean Conney and Ursula Andress on location in Jamaica

 

Sean Connery and Ursula Andress seated on deck chairs
Sean Connery and Ursula Andress seated on deck chairs

 

Sean Connery rests while filming Dr No
Sean Connery rests while filming Dr No (1962). Yet more Red Stripe beer bottles.

 

Contact sheet of Bunny Yeager from photographing Ursula Andress at Laughing Waters
Bunny Yaeger's Wikipedia - Bunny Yeager contact sheet from photographing Ursula Andress at Laughing Waters.

 

Ursula Andress by Bunny Yaeger

 

Ursula Andress wears a shirt over her bikini, photographed by Bunny Yeager at Laughing Waters

 

Ursula Andress at Laughing Waters with shirt over bikini

 

Ursula Andress with Scuba dive knife

 

Ursula Andress at Laughing Waters

 

Ursula Andress

 

 

Ursula Andress

 

Ursula Andress at Laughing waters with Scuba mask and Conch shell

 

Ursula Andress, with Conch shell and Scuba dive knife
Honey Rider's dive knife appears to be one of the generic German-made knives common at that time. The prop used in Jamaica and the prop used for the studio shots at Pinewood were different.

 

Ursula Andress seated on a canoe, photographed by Bunny Yaeger
Ursula Andress photographed by Bunny Yeager

 

 

Sean Connery showing his Rolex Submariner

 

 

Ursula Andress

 

Sean Connery

 

Laughing Waters: Ursula Andress and her husband John Derek. John Derek's camera case is by Zero Halliburton
Laughing Waters: Ursula Andress and her husband John Derek. John Derek's camera case is by Zero Halliburton

 

Ian Fleming visited the location at Laughing Waters with his wife Anne where they met the cast and crew. Fleming was clearly impressed with Ursula Andress because he wrote her into a scene in his novel On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1963) which he was working on at the time:

Irma Bunt is speaking to James Bond:


   She waved a hand towards the crowded tables around them. 'A most interesting crowd, do you not find, Sair Hilary? Everybody who is anybody. We have quite taken the international set away from Gstaad and St Moritz. That is your Duke of Marlborough over there with such a gay party of young things. And near by that is Mr Whitney and Lady Daphne Straight. Is she not chic? They are both wonderful skiers. And that beautiful girl with the long fair hair at the big table, that is Ursula Andress, the film star. What a wonderful tan she has! And Sir George Dunbar, he always has the most enchanting companions.' The box-like smile. 'Why, we only need the Aga Khan and perhaps your Duke of Kent and we would have everybody, but everybody. Is it not sensational for the first season?'


- Sir George Dunbar was a friend of Fleming's and part of his inner circle. Andrew Lycett in his biography of Ian Fleming describes Dunbar on page 81.

Scene:
Location Dunn River Falls

 


View Larger Map

Dunn River Falls

 

Sean Connery and Ursula Andres at Laughing Waters, Jamaica
Dunn River Falls

 

Ursula Andress at Dunn River Falls

 

Dunn River Falls: James Bond cleans his Walther while talking with Honey Ryder who has removed her 37 Pattern belt
James Bond cleans his Walther PP Wikipedia - Walther PP while talking with Honey Ryder at Dunn River Falls

 

Scene: Hiding under the water
Location: White River

Sean Connery's Rolex Submariner in Dr No (1962) at the White River

 

Publicity still of Sean Connery and Ursula Andress at the White River, Jamaica

 

James Bond's Rolex Submariner
01:06:45

 

Jamaica White River Sean Connery holds the clapperboard wearing a Rolex Submariner with a leather two piece strap
Production still: White River. Sean Connery holds the clapperboard.

 

Ursula Andress, Sean Connery, John Kitzmiller
Ursula Andress, Sean Connery, John Kitzmiller

 

 

 

 

 

Scene: Encounter with a dragon
Location: Falmouth


View Larger Map

Falmouth and the Mangrove Swamps

 

 

 

Scene: The decontamination shower
Location: Pinewood Studios

Sean Connery and Ursula Andress at Pinewood Studios on the set of the decontamination shower by Getty Images
Sean Connery and Ursula Andress at Pinewood Studios on the set of the decontamination shower by Getty Images

 

01:16:47 James Bond and Honey Ryder enter the decontamination shower
01:16:47 James Bond and Honey Ryder enter the decontamination shower

 

The decontamination shower scene: Ursula Andress wears a flesh colored bikini
On the right is a studio still showing the bikini which Ursula Andress wore for the decontamination shower scene. For years there was speculation that she was nude for this scene but in fact editor Peter Hunt left on a frame at the end (01:16:47) where you can glimpse her swimsuit as she reaches the end of the track.

 

Ursula Andress in a flesh colored swimsuit during the shooting of the de-contamination shower scene
Ursula Andress in a flesh colored swimsuit during the shooting of the de-contamination shower scene

 

Scene: Dr No's apartments
Location: Pinewood Studios

- Bond is served a Martini: Dr No narrates: "medium dry Martini lemon peeled shaken not stirred". For the purposes of plausibility, Dr No almost certainly had several individuals at Bond's hôtel on his own payroll. Agents dispatched to foreign parts are almost always at their most vulnerable at their hôtels because both sides know that agents will be rotating in and out of the hôtels and will tend to behave predictably in their dining habits and sampling of the night-life. The period of the post-Cold War was most interesting in this respect, in that freedom to travel had arrived but the existing Cold War intelligence agencies and their agents were continuing in the only manner they knew how. And the manner they knew how in Eastern Europe immediately after the Wall came down was in the 1950s manner which they had run the Cold War. 1950s methods and 1950s technology. You could hear them bumbling on the old analogue telephone lines. Their bugs and cameras were decades out of date. Their methods crude, with the obvious evidence that one's hôtel room had been searched while one was out, or that there was someone listening to your conversation at the next breakfast table. #

- At the dinner table, Bond mentions the Tong Wars Wikipedia - Tong War

 

Scene: Dr No's complex
Location: Bauxite Key at Ochos Rios

 


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Scene: Inside Dr No's control room
Location: Pinewood Studios

 

Pinewood Studios: Dr No. Sean Connery and Ian Fleming
Ian Fleming on the set of Dr No speaks with Sean Connery

Pinewood Studios: Dr No. Sean Connery and Ian Fleming

 

Pinewood Studios: Sean Connery and Ian Fleming on Ken Adam's set of Dr No's nuclear reactor
Pinewood Studios: Sean Connery and Ian Fleming on Ken Adam's set of Dr No's nuclear reactor

 

Pinewood Studios: Sean Connery and Ian Fleming on Ken Adam's set of Dr No's nuclear reactor
d

 

Scene: Bond and Honey slip their rescuers
Location: St Anne's Bay

- This scene was the first to be filmed on arrival in Jamaica.

 

Dr No (1963) Sean Connery and Ursula Andress in the boat

 

 

 

 

+ GOLDENEYE

Jamica Orcabessa Ian Fleming's house Goldeneye from seaward
Goldeneye

 

- Ian Fleming's house at Goldeneye Wikipedia - Goldeneye Link - Goldeneye. Ian Fleming called his retreat Goldeneye after the title of his favorite book Reflections in a Golden Eye Wikipedia - Link - . Fleming had two months paid leave per annum in which he used to retire to Goldeneye and write another Bond novel.

 


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Ian Fleming's house at Goldeneye

 

 

Ian Fleming at Goldeneye
Ian Fleming near Goldeneye.

Fleming used to purchase donkey and cow carcases then have them dumped in the water off the beach at Goldeneye so that he could entertain his friends with the sight of the sharks' frenzied feeding on the carcass.

From Islands in the Stream by Ernest Hemingway, Chapter 01 'Bimini', Hemingway, writing between the wars, writes of his beach house overlooking the reef on Bimini:


   The house was built on the highest part of the narrow tongue of land between the harbor and the open sea. It had lasted through three hurricanes and it was built solid as a ship. It was shaded by tall coconut palms that were bent by the trade wind and on the ocean side you could walk out of the door and down the bluff across the white sand and into the Gulf Stream. The water of the Stream was usually a dark blue when you looked out at it when there was no wind. But when you walked out into it there was just the green light of the water over that floury white sand and you could see the shadow of any big fish a long time before he could ever come in close to the beach.
   It was a safe and fine place to bathe in the day but it was no place to swim at night. At night the sharks came in close to the beach, hunting in the edge of the Stream and from the upper porch of the house on quiet nights you could hear the splashing of the fish they hunted and if you went down to the beach you could see the phosphorescent wakes they made in the water. At night the sharks had no fear and everything else feared them. But in the day they stayed out away from the clear white sand and if they did come in you could see their shadows a long way away.
   A man named Thomas Hudson, who was a good painter, lived there in that house and worked there and on the island the greater part of the year. After one has lived in those latitudes long enough the changes of the seasons become as important there as anywhere else and Thomas Hudson, who loved the island, did not want to miss any spring, nor summer, nor any fall or winter.
   Sometimes the summers were too hot when the wind dropped in August or when the trade winds sometimes failed in June and July. Hurricanes, too, might come in September and October and even in early November and there could be freak tropical storms any time from June on. But the true hurricane months have fine weather when there are no storms.


Andrew Lycett in his biography of Ian Fleming retells an event where some of Fleming's house guests swim out beyond the reef and into the open sea only to be rescued by Fleming in a rowboat. Andrew Lycett concludes that although Fleming was ready enough to write about physical danger, he himself was averse to it. I disagree with Lycett and my personal opinion was that Fleming was in this instance just a lot more familiar with the serious dangers of what lay beyond the reef than his houseguests. If you have undertaken Scuba diving in Caribbean waters on the seaward side of the reef, you will know what I mean. The way to survive to old age is to meet the enemy on terms advantageous to you and avoid meeting him on terms greatly advantageous to him.

In Ian Fleming's novel Octopussy (1966) he describes the population of the reef and its worst danger to reef swimmer, the scorpion fish:


   Part of Major Smythe’s mind took in all these brilliantly colored little “people” and he greeted them in unspoken words. (“Morning, Beau Gregory” to the dark blue demoiselle sprinkled with bright blue spots—the jewelfish that exactly resembles the starlit fashioning of a bottle of Guerlain’s Dans La Nuit; “Sorry. Not today, sweetheart” to a fluttering butterflyfish with false black eyes on its tail; and “You’re too fat anyway, Blue Boy,” to an indigo parrotfish that must have weighed a good ten pounds.) But today he had a job to do and his eyes were searching for only one of his “people”—his only enemy on the reef, the only one he killed on sight, a scorpionfish.
   The scorpionfish inhabits most of the southern waters of the world, and the rascasse that is the foundation of bouillabaisse belongs to the family. The West Indian variety runs up to only about twelve inches long and perhaps a pound ha weight. It is by far the ugliest fish in the sea, as if nature were giving warning. It is a mottled brownish gray with a heavy wedge-shaped shaggy head. It has fleshy pendulous “eyebrows” that droop over angry red eyes and a coloration and broken silhouette that are perfect camouflage on the reef. Though a small fish, its heavily toothed mouth is so wide that it can swallow whole most of the smaller reef fishes, but its supreme weapon lies in its erectile dorsal fins, the first few of which, acting on contact like hypodermic needles, are fed by poison glands containing enough dotoxin to kill a man if they merely graze him in a vulnerable spot—in an artery, for instance, or over the heart or in the groin. It constitutes the only real danger to the reef swimmer, far more dangerous than the barracuda or the shark, because, supreme in its confidence in its camouflage and armory, it flees before nothing except the very close approach of a foot or actual contact. Then it flits only a few yards, on wide and bizarrely striped pectorals, and settles again watchfully either on the sand, where it looks like a lump of overgrown coral, or among the rocks and seaweed where it virtually disappears. And Major Smythe was determined to find one and spear it and give it to his octopus to see if it would take it or spurn it—to see if one of the ocean’s great predators would recognize the deadliness of another, know of its poison. Would the octopus consume the belly and leave the spines? Would it eat the lot? And if so, would it suffer from the poison? These were the questions Bengry at the Institute wanted answered, and today, since it was going to be the beginning of the end of Major Smythe’s life at Wavelets—and though it might mean the end of his darling Octopussy—Major Smythe had decided to find out the answers and leave one tiny memorial to his now futile life in some dusty corner of the Institute’s marine biological files.


 

From Ian Fleming's novel Octopussy (1966) he describes the population of the North Shore:


   And though he ate their canapes and drank their martinis, he had nothing but contempt for the international riffraff with whom he consorted on the North Shore. He could perhaps have made friends with the more solid elements—the gentleman-farmers inland, the plantation owners on the coast, the professional men, the politicians—but that would mean regaining some serious purpose in life which his sloth, his spiritual accidie, prevented, and cutting down on the bottle, which he was definitely unwilling to do.


 

Ian Fleming and Blanche at Goldeneye
Ian Fleming and Blanche at Goldeneye.

Ian Fleming on the verandah at Goldeneye
Ian Fleming on the verandah at Goldeneye

Goldeneye: Ian Fleming in the garden with servants
Goldeneye: Ian Fleming in the garden

Ian Fleming at his desk at Goldeneye with his typewriter
Ian Fleming at his desk at Goldeneye.

In James Bond - The Legacy by John Cork and Bruce Scivally published by Boxtree 2002, page 15, Cork & Scivally report that Fleming's golden typewriter was used to write Live and Let Die (1954) in Jamaica, but it remained in London on subsequent trips. The gold plated Royal was in fact a model available off-the-shelf. Cork & Scivally also report that Fleming drank coffee from the Blue Mountain estates Wikipedia - Jamaican Blue Mountain during his morning writing routine.

From The Man with the Golden Typewriter by Fergus Fleming:


   Behind the confidence lay a measure of uncertainty. Fleming had always longed for success, but failing that would settle for the trappings. So, in anticipation, he ordered a gold-plated typewriter from New York to congratulate himself on finishing his first novel. It was a Royal Quiet de Luxe, cost $174, and to avoid customs duty it was smuggled in by his friend Ivar Bryce as part of his luggage when he visited on the Queen Elizabeth later that year. It wasn’t a custom-made machine – Royal had produced several of them – and his literary acquaintances considered it the height of vulgarity. Fleming did not care. It was the sheer, ridiculous delight of the thing. He owned a Golden Typewriter!


 

Ian Fleming in his study at Goldeneye with his dogs
Ian Fleming in his study at Goldeneye with his dogs

From The Man with the Golden Typewriter by Fergus Fleming: In 1961 ornithologist James Bond discovered that his name had been used by Fleming:


   TO MRS. JAMES BOND, 721, Davidson Road, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia 18, Pasadena
   ‘It was inevitable we should catch up with you . . .’ On which ominous note Mrs James Bond began her letter of 1 February 1961. Fleming had never made any secret of the fact that he had borrowed his hero’s name from one of his favourite books, Birds of the West Indies, by the American ornithologist James Bond. But now, almost ten years after he had written Casino Royale, news reached the Bonds that ‘you had brazenly picked up the name of a real human being for your rascal’. They didn’t really mind, as the real Bond had led an adventurous life, his colourful exploits being not too far, in the ornithological scale of things, from those of his fictional equivalent. ‘I told MY JB he could sue you for defamation of character,’ Mrs Bond concluded cheerfully. ‘But JBBA [James Bond British Agent] is too much fun for that and JB authenticus regards the whole thing as “a joke”.’
   
   20th June, 1961
   Dear Mrs James Bond,
   I don’t know where to begin to ask your forgiveness for my very tardy acknowledgement to your letter of February 1st.
   I received it in Jamaica and since I was almost on the way to Nassau I decided to telephone the Chaplins on arrival and get in touch with you and your husband.
   Unfortunately I could get no reply from their telephone number and I again put your letter aside. Then, when I got back to England in March, I proceeded to have a swift heart attack which laid me out until now, and it is only today that your letter is again before me and blackest of consciences is sitting on my shoulder.
   I will confess at once that your husband has every reason to sue me in every possible position and for practically every kind of libel in the book, for I will now confess the damnable truth.
   I have a small house which I built in Oracabessa in Jamaica just after the war and, some ten years ago a confirmed bachelor on the eve of marriage, I decided to take my mind off the dreadful prospect by writing a thriller.
   I was determined that my secret agent should be as anonymous a personality as possible, even his name should be the very reverse of the kind of “Peregrine Carruthers” whom one meets in this type of fiction.
   At that time one of my bibles was, and still is, “Birds of the West Indies” by James Bond, and it struck me that this name, brief, unromantic and yet very masculine, was just what I needed and so James Bond II was born, and started off on the career that, I must confess, has been meteoric culminating with his choice by your President as his favourite thriller hero (see Life of March 17th).
   So there is my dreadful confession together with limitless apologies and thanks for the fun and fame I have had from the most extraordinary chance choice of so many years ago.
   In return I can only offer your James Bond unlimited use of the name Ian Fleming for any purposes he may think fit. Perhaps one day he will discover some particularly horrible species of bird which he would like to christen in an insulting fashion that might be a way of getting his own back.
   Anyway I send you both my most affectionate regards and good wishes, and should you ever return to Jamaica I would be very happy indeed to lend you my house for a week or so, so that you may inspect in comfort the shrine where the second James Bond was born.


 

1964 Jamaica Goldeneye: Ornithologist James Bond meets Ian Fleming
Jamaica 1964 at Goldeneye: Ornithologist James Bond meets Ian Fleming

 

 

 

 

+ FIREFLY

- Noël Cowards house Firefly Wikipedia - Firefly Estate. Noël Coward had purchased the land from Blanche Blackwell, whose family owned thousands of acres on Jamaica.

 

Article Ian Fleming, Noël Coward, and Jamaica from Blueharbour Link - Blue Harbour


   Noël Coward, Blue Harbour and Firefly
   
   Noël Coward, the multi-talented British playwright, actor, songwriter raconteur, first visited Jamaica in 1944 on a two week holiday. The and peace of mind he found in Jamaica caused him to refer to it as his "dream island" and he vowed to return one day. Four years later he rented fellow author Ian Fleming's estate, Goldeneye (as in the recent 007 movie by the same name), located on the north shore of Jamaica in St. Mary's province. During a six-week stay at Goldeneye he became even more taken with the island and he combed the immediate area determined to acquire an estate of his own.
   His search for a suitable property kept leading Coward to a place he called "a magical spot" ten miles down the coast from Fleming. It was situated on a slope that lead to a rocky beach and commanded an incredible view of the sea, the Blue Mountains, Cabarita Island and the nearby fishing and marketing town of Port Maria. The property, marked by a small "For Sale" sign was allegedly prone to landslides. Upon further investigation, it was found to have a solid rock foundation, perfectly suitable for building. Coward purchased the eight acres, tucked around a cove in the shape of a half-moon, for a song. With his architect Scovell he began planning the construction of his Jamaican retreat, which he dubbed "Coward's Folly". The building schedule was set and he left the island.
   Upon his return to Jamaica a year later a two story villa and two guest cottages had been constructed and much of the landscaping had been completed. Inspired by the view of the surrounding Caribbean, Coward named his sanctuary "Blue Harbour".
   Coward settled into his new Jamaican house and sent invitations to all his friends. He had a swimming pool built at the edge of the sea into which fresh saltwater could be pumped and then drained. Almond trees and coconut palms provided abundant shade from the noonday sun.
   By the early 1950's Blue Harbour was in full swing, staffed by a cook, a chambermaid, several gardeners and a chauffeur. Coward began to play host to a wide spectrum of noted artists, actors, celebrities, socialites and dignitaries. The guest list included Laurence Olivier Wikipedia - , Vivien Leigh Wikipedia - , David Niven Wikipedia - , Alfred Lunt Wikipedia - and Lynn Fontane Wikipedia - , Errol Flynn Wikipedia - , Alec Guiness Wikipedia - , Marlene Dietrich Wikipedia - , Katherine Hepburn Wikipedia - , Mary Martin Wikipedia - , John Gielgud Wikipedia - , Claudette Colbert Wikipedia - , and Patricia Neal Wikipedia - to name a few. They flocked to Blue Harbour and Coward's gregarious personality, some for the day and some for the month as house guests. Jamaica was the place to be and Blue Harbour was an obligatory stop on the North Coast cocktail circuit.
   Swarmed by visitors and feeling an urgent need for privacy, Coward began to seek out a retreat away from his retreat. With much foresight he had already purchased another beautiful tract of land called "Lookout", located on a lush hillside one thousand feet above Blue Harbour. Lookout had belonged to Sir Henry Morgan Wikipedia - , the infamous buccaneer and first governor of Jamaica. Morgan had constructed a small fortress-like house from which he could spy on any stray galleon that deviated from the main sea route which looped south from Cuba, ninety miles away. He considered the Bay of Port Maria his private domain and seized any ship that wandered into his waters.
   In 1956, Coward renamed Lookout "Firefly" after the peenywallys or lightning bugs that would congregate and illuminate the night sky. On the grounds, he designed and built a new house geared to suit the needs of one person: himself. He would now divide his time between the bustling social life at Blue Harbour and the peaceful solitude of Firefly, where he would write and paint and enjoy his "room with a view".
   In the 1960's Jamaica was booming as the jet set turned into it's existence. Fleming's international spy-thrillers had gained popularity and film crew arrived at Goldeneye to shoot "Dr. No" with an unknown actor named Sean Connery. Fleming took the name of his hero, James Bond, from the author of a classic ornithological tome called "Birds of the West Indies".
   Coward has achieved further success performing on American TV and doing his cabaret act in Las Vegas, where he was championed by Sammy Davis, Jr. and Frank Sinatra. In 1965 Elizabeth the Queen Mother visited Blue Harbour and Firefly, where she had a lobster mousse for lunch. Winston Churchill paid his respects several times to Coward and was quoted as saying, "An Englishman has an inalienable right to live wherever he chooses".
   After all those delightful years in Jamaica, Noël Coward died there on March 26, 1973 and was buried at his beloved Firefly. His grave overlooks Blue Harbour and his memory lives on.


 


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Noël Coward's house, Firefly

 

Sean Connery and Noël Coward at Firefly
Sean Connery and Sir Noël Coward

 

Noel Coward in Jamaica
Noël Coward told that Ian Fleming died "because his life failed to come up to the dream he had of it.".

 

 

 

NATO TPC J26-C section Jamaica, showing locations used in Dr No 1962 and Live and Let Die 1973 and the location of Ian Flemings Goldeneye
NATO airchart TPC J26-C section Jamaica showing locations used in Dr No (1962).

 

 

 

 

 

- Filming ended in Jamaica on 30-MAR-1962 and began on Pinewood Studios' D stage thereafter.

- Cinema Retro Wikipedia - Cinema Retro Link - Cinema Retro Magazine Link - Cinema Retro Twitter Feed in their special edition on Dr No (1962) have discovered photographs of a birthday party given in honor of Ursula Andress which was held in Heatherden Hall, the old country house in the Pinewood grounds which is used for entertaining. You can see the interior of this dining room in The Ipcress File (1965), where it is used as the interior of a gentlemens' club.

Jack Lord and Sean Connery enjoy a break for coffee. Sean Connery holds his black cigarette holder which contains a Gauloise
Jack Lord and Sean Connery enjoy a break for coffee or more likely tea, since English production crews ran on gallons of tea, regardless of where they were in the world.

Sean Connery holds his black cigarette holder which contains a Gauloise. Cinema Retro Wikipedia - Cinema Retro Link - Cinema Retro Magazine Link - Cinema Retro Twitter Feed in their special edition on Dr No (1962) have unearthed in what is a remarkable piece of scholarship what is almost certainly the first ever press article on James Bond as a screen presence, dated the day before the cast and crew flew to begin filming in Jamaica. In the article the interviewer states that Sean Connery smoked a Gauloise Wikipedia - Gauloises in a stubby black cigarette holder. By a stroke of luck which is equalled in magnitude only by Cinema Retro's diligence in research only days later I was reviewing some photographs of the making of Dr No (1962) and spotted the photograph above. Sure enough, there is Sean Connery smoking a Gauloise Wikipedia - Gauloises from a stubby black cigarette holder. Gauloise were unavailable in England at that time and would not be imported into England until the 1990s. The only source would have been from someone who was returning from France. Even then, UK customs regulations permitted only one box of 200 cigarettes to be brought back into the UK. Smoking Gauloise Wikipedia - Gauloises in London at that time would have marked you out as sophisticated and travelled.

 

In the studio: Sean Connery, Eunice Gayson, Yvonne Shima and Ursula Andress
Back at the studio: Sean Connery, Eunice Gayson, Yvonne Shima, Ursula Andress

 

Pinewood Studios: Sean Connery poses with Walther PP and Rolex Submariner
Pinewood Studios: Sean Connery with Walther PP Wikipedia - Walther PP

 

Sean Connery, Ian Fleming, Cubby Broccoli, Harry Salzman
Sean Connery, Ian Fleming, Cubby Broccoli, Harry Salzman

 

 

PRODUCTION SCHEDULE

Dates

Location

1961-NOV

Jamaica: Scouting for locations

1962-JAN-14

Cast and Crew leave for Jamaica on a chartered BOAC flight.

1962-JAN-16

Filming starts at Palisadoes Airport, Kingston, Jamaica, with the scene with the photographer.

1962-JAN-16/17

Scene at the White River. Bond and Honey escape from Dr No's guards.

1962-JAN-22/23

Nightclub scene.

1962-JAN-24

Fight with Pussfeller

1962-FEB-06

Ursula Andress and Sean Connery escape in the boat.

1962-FEB-08/14

Laughing Water Estate

1962-FEB-12/15

Falmouth, Vanzie swamp.

1962-FEB-19

Bauxite Dock

1962-FEB-16

Locations shooting completes

#

Pinewood Studios: M's office

1962-MAR-02

Pinewood Studios: Set of Les Ambassadeurs.

1962#####

Birthday of Ursula Andress

1962-OCT-05

Gala screening London Leicester Square.

   

On return from Jamaica to London, Ian Fleming went to a private screening of Dr No (1962) at a Soho cinema. Afterwards he dined at the invitation of Terence Young at the Travellers Club Link - . Later that year, Fleming's doctor told him that he had , at most, five years to live. And by 1964, Ian Fleming would be dead.

 

 

 

 

Anthony Sinclair fits Sean Connery for a suit
Anthony Sinclair fits Sean Connery for a suit for Dr No (1962). Anthony Sinclair was tailor to director Terence Young, hence Connery being sent to them for his suits.

Sean Connery at a fitting

Turnbull & Asser: Mr Fish fits Sean Connery for his shirts
Turnbull & Asser: Mr Fish fits Sean Connery for his shirts

 

Connery's shirts were fitted by Mr Fish Link - Blogspot Dandy in Aspic Mr Fish at Jermyn Street stalwart Turnbull & Asser.

Turnbull and Asser compliments slip showing the royal warrant and informing addressee of the readiness of their order

 

Turnbull & Asser: Mr Fish fits Sean Connery for his shirts
Turnbull & Asser: Mr Fish

 

Turnbull & Asser: Mr Fish fits Sean Connery for his shirts
Turnbull & Asser: Mr Fish fits Sean Connery for his shirts

 

Cinema Retro Wikipedia - Cinema Retro Link - Cinema Retro Magazine Link - Cinema Retro Twitter Feed report that report that Sean Connery left with the entire cast and crew on the flight to Kingston wearing his Anthony Sinclair suit, his Turnbull & Asser shirt, his Anthony Sinclair overcoat and a James Lock Homburg. Which is exactly what he would be wearing on location. There is a photograph of Connery, director Terence Young and several others on the gangplank of the BOAC aircraft which EON had chartered, at Heathrow. The aircraft appears to have been a BOAC Vickers Viscount, which was routed via New York. Hence the long flight.

 

A label from an Anthony Sinclair suit - 29 Conduit Street W1 telephone Mayfair 6682
A label from an Anthony Sinclair suit. 29 Conduit Street W1 telephone Mayfair 6682. Conduit Street is at the north end of Saville Row.

One of the tailors which Ian Fleming used was Benson Perry and Whitley of 9 Cork Street, which is the street immediately West of Saville Row . Benson Perry and Whitley were one of the 'Big Ten' which were the major tailors in a group of about thirty tailors based in and around Saville Row (Burlington Gardens, Cork Street, Conduit Street, Sackville Street, Clifford Street). By the 1970s, Cork Street had become mainly art galleries. Most of central London is owned by the families which originally owned the land, the manors, around the small areas containing buildings such as the City of London and the City of Westminster. This means that in order to trade from these premises one must take a lease on a building. This means that the rents reflect the commercial market rate for space, and traditional businesses such as tailors must make large returns on their trade in order to be able to afford the lease on their building.

 

- Andrew Lycett in his biography of Ian Fleming on page 393 writes of 1961:


   As for his own film the Dr No project Ian washed his hands of involvement with the script, and Eon liked it that way. Broccoli told Guy Hamilton, his original choice as director, that he was going to "fix" the Bond which was "full of nonsense". With input from Mankowitz, he was going to introduce a variety of fantastic elements such as portraying the reclusive Dr No as a monkey, rather than a man. Declining the job this time, Hamilton tried to convince Broccoli that the project's charm lay in Ian's detail.
   Ian had his own opinion about who should play Bond. He suggested his friend David Niven and then Roger Moore who was enjoying some success as The Saint on television. But Broccoli had already set his mind on an almost unknown Scottish actor called Sean Connery as having 'it'. Ian remained equivocal about the choice: He was not sure if a working class Scotsman had the social graces to play his hero. His mind was swayed by a female opinion. When he invited Connery to lunch at the Savoy, another guest, Ivar Bryce's attractive cousin Janet, who had recently married the Marquess of Milford Haven, pronounced Connery as having 'it', and that was good enough for Ian. His own assistance to the film was limited to find location sites in Jamaica, where shooting was scheduled for the following Spring. He wrote to his friend Reginald Maudling, the new Colonial Secretary to ask about the use of Government House. But Maudling replied that, as the governor was portrayed as nincompoop and his secretary as a spy, the answer was no. Ian was more successful in securing the Brownlow's Rolling River estate on the north coast of Jamaica.


 

 

From The Man with the Golden Typewriter by Fergus Fleming:


   TO HARRY SALTZMAN, ESQ., 16, South Audley Street, London, W.1.
   Producers Harry Saltzman and Cubby Broccoli soon discovered, as Cape had before them, that Fleming liked to become involved in the minutiae of production.
   31st August, 1961
   Dear Harry,
   While I remember it, I met last night an extremely intelligent and attractive coloured man called Paul Dankwa,7 who is studying law here but has been very much taken up by the bohemian set, and I have met him on and off for several years. He told me he had just finished appearing in the film ‘A Taste of Honey’. I think it would be worthwhile you tracking him down and having a look at him for the role of Quarrel in Dr. No. His address is, 9 Overstrand Mansions, Prince of Wales’s Drive, Battersea, telephone Macaulay 5212.
   I told him I would mention his name to you and he was very excited at the prospect.
   He has all the qualities this role demands and, in particular, a most pleasing personality and good looks.
   
   TO MRS. BLACKWELL, Bolt, Port Maria, Jamaica
   Apart from suggesting possible cast members, Fleming decided to organise accommodation in Jamaica for the film crew of ‘Doctor No,’ and to arrange a recording studio for the soundtrack. Writing to his neighbour (and mistress) Blanche Blackwell he wondered if her musically inclined son Christopher might like the job.8
   25th October, 1961
   Forgive the typing but a lot of this is going to be boring stuff for you to pass on to Christopher.
   The Company has written to Christopher giving him most of the dope and asking him to be their local contact and production assistant on ‘Dr. No’.
   They will probably want him to do such miscellaneous jobs as recommending hotel accommodation and beating down the proprietor, for 60 or 70 people. He will also have to dig out and suggest local actors and actresses for small parts and keep an eye on the labour to see that it keeps working happily during the six or eight weeks they will be shooting.
   The suggested location is the Morant Lighthouse area with those swamps behind and the beach you and I know. I have suggested that they put the team up at Anthony Jenkinson’s hotel, but I am not sure if he has enough rooms. Christopher might like to have a word with him about it. But of course they may decide it is too far from Morant and prefer one or other of those hotels up behind Kingston.
   They also want to do all their musical score for the picture in Jamaica, and this should be a real chance for Christopher to seek out talent and lease them his recording studio.
   I have no idea what fee to recommend Christopher to ask for, but I should think £100 a week for his general services and extra for studio and sound recording, etc. But perhaps he had better wait and see what they offer when Saltzman, the producer, and the rest of them arrive around January 11th.
   I am sure Christopher will do this job splendidly and I think he will find it enormous fun.
   The producer, Terence Young ,9 seems very nice and the man they have chosen for Bond, Sean Connery, is a real charmer – fairly unknown but a good actor with the right looks and physique.
   If Christopher does well on this assignment it can easily lead to others in Jamaica and elsewhere and an exciting sideline for him.
   All your news about the hedge and the flowers is very exciting. You are an angel to have taken so much trouble and I am longing to see it all.
   But this is dreadful news about the car. I have always feared you would run into trouble with it and it’s a blessing that you survived. For heaven’s sake get something smaller and more manageable for those twisty roads, and stop driving so fast, there’s absolutely no hurry!
   My Jamaica plans are now changed after many stormy sessions [with Ann] and we come out together around January 20th and have much the same programme as last year.[. . .]
   No other news for now, but it certainly looks as if we are all going to have great fun with this film business in January.


 

Meanwhile in 1961-JUN-20, the real James Bond catches up with the fictional James Bond:

From The Man with the Golden Typewriter by Fergus Fleming:


   
   20th June, 1961
   Dear Mrs James Bond,
   I don’t know where to begin to ask your forgiveness for my very tardy acknowledgement to your letter of February 1st.
   I received it in Jamaica and since I was almost on the way to Nassau I decided to telephone the Chaplins on arrival and get in touch with you and your husband.
   Unfortunately I could get no reply from their telephone number and I again put your letter aside. Then, when I got back to England in March, I proceeded to have a swift heart attack which laid me out until now, and it is only today that your letter is again before me and blackest of consciences is sitting on my shoulder.
   I will confess at once that your husband has every reason to sue me in every possible position and for practically every kind of libel in the book, for I will now confess the damnable truth.
   I have a small house which I built in Oracabessa in Jamaica just after the war and, some ten years ago a confirmed bachelor on the eve of marriage, I decided to take my mind off the dreadful prospect by writing a thriller.
   I was determined that my secret agent should be as anonymous a personality as possible, even his name should be the very reverse of the kind of “Peregrine Carruthers” whom one meets in this type of fiction.
   At that time one of my bibles was, and still is, “Birds of the West Indies” by James Bond, and it struck me that this name, brief, unromantic and yet very masculine, was just what I needed and so James Bond II was born, and started off on the career that, I must confess, has been meteoric culminating with his choice by your President as his favourite thriller hero (see Life of March 17th).
   So there is my dreadful confession together with limitless apologies and thanks for the fun and fame I have had from the most extraordinary chance choice of so many years ago.
   In return I can only offer your James Bond unlimited use of the name Ian Fleming for any purposes he may think fit. Perhaps one day he will discover some particularly horrible species of bird which he would like to christen in an insulting fashion that might be a way of getting his own back.
   Anyway I send you both my most affectionate regards and good wishes, and should you ever return to Jamaica I would be very happy indeed to lend you my house for a week or so, so that you may inspect in comfort the shrine where the second James Bond was born.


 

From The Man with the Golden Typewriter by Fergus Fleming:


   TO SIR WILLIAM STEPHENSON, 450 East 52nd Street, New York
   7th November, 1961
   Many thanks for your chastening cable which actually fetched up at the right address. Please use it frequently.
   Not much news from here. My host of medical advisers seem to be delighted with my recovery and, as you can imagine, I am losing no time in loosening up on their counsels of moderation in all things.
   The film deal with United Artists is going ahead and they are going to film ‘DR NO’ in Jamaica in January and February, and the advance party has already gone out to prospect for location. But, as usual with show business, no actual money has actually changed hands yet.
   I shall be coming out to Jamaica around January 18th and will be paying you my usual visit around the middle of March. So please warn The Pierre to lay in plenty of oysters.


 

 

 

 

 

2013-OCT - - Cinema Retro Wikipedia - Cinema Retro Link - Cinema Retro Magazine have published a special edition devoted to Dr No (1962) featuring interviews with Ursula Andress, Sir Ken Adam (by Sir Christopher Frayling). Do not leave for Jamaica without it. This reference work is the primary authority on Dr No (1962) and the origins of cinematic Bond.

Cinema Retro edition "Dr No"

 

 

 

+ SEE ALSO

- Caribbean

- Ian Fleming's short story Octopussy (1966) set on the North Shore of Jamaica

- The Dark of the Sun (1968) , which was filmed entirely in Jamaica.

- Ian Fleming's novel Dr No (1958)

- Ian Fleming's short story Octopussy (1966) , is set on the North Shore of Jamaica and in Kitzbühl, both places beloved of Ian Fleming. The events in Octopussy (1966) subsequently become pivotal in SPECTRE (2015).

- James Bond's Rolex

- Live and Let Die (1973)

- Ian Fleming's novel The Man with the Golden Gun (1965).

- Ian Fleming's novel Thunderball (1963)

 

+ EXTERNAL LINKS

- Filmlocations for Dr No (1962) at Reelstreets Link - Dr No at Reel Streets

- Link - Dr No (1962) at Movies Planet Dr No (1962) at MoviesPlanet

- Cinema Retro Wikipedia - Cinema Retro Link - Cinema Retro Magazine Link - Cinema Retro Twitter Feed Magazine

- Link - The Commanders Club - James Bond & Ian Fleming in Jamaica

- Wikipedia - IMFDB - Dr No (1962) Dr No (1962) at the Internet Movie Firearms Database

- Sean Connery in Dr No (1962) Link - Sean Connery's suits in Dr No (1962)

- Conduit Cut Blogspot Link - Conduit Cut Blogspot - The tailoring of Anthony Sinclair

- The Suits of James Bond Link - Suits of James Bond

- GoCaribbean on Bond Link - Go Caribbean on Bond

- Ursula Andress's bikini sold at Christie's Link - Ursula Andress's bikini at Christie's

- Goldeneye Wikipedia - Goldeneye Link - Goldeneye

- Link -  007 Museum on Fleming's house Goldeneye` - www.007museum.com - 007 Museum on Fleming's house Goldeneye

- Link -  Literary 007 on Fleming's house Goldeneye ` - www.literary007.com on Fleming's house Goldeneye

- Navy Island Wikipedia - Navy Island, Jamaica & Errol Flynn, Richard Burton & Elizabeth Taylor, Noël Coward

- Frenchman's Cove Wikipedia - Frenchman's Cove

- Whale Cay and "Joe" Carstairs Wikipedia - "Joe" Carstairs , Marlene Dietrich. Link - www.luxist.com - Great Whale Cay for sale

- Ministry of Rum Link - www.ministryofrum.com

- Link - Sean Connery introduces Geoffrey Boothroyd Sean Connery introduces Geoffrey Boothroyd

 

+ BIBLIOGRAPHY

- The Life of Ian Fleming by John Pearson published by Jonathan Cape 1967 - Pearson worked under Fleming at the Sunday Times

- Ian Fleming by Andrew Lycett published by Phoenix 1995 ISBN 1-85799-783-2 - extensive biography of Ian Fleming

-- Note the first Bond encyclopedia (below) is published in 1983 likely because videotape players and movie publishing on videotape did not come in until 1980, which meant that study of Bond movies required an extraordinary memory or access to something like college movie projector. Nothing really beats the atmosphere of a darkened room and the whir of the projection machinery.

- The James Bond Films - A Behind the Scenes History by Steven Jay Ruben published by Arlington House 1983

- The James Bond Bedside Companion, by Raymond Benson, published by Boxtree in London, 1988

- The Incredible World Of 007 by Lee Pfeiffer and Philip Lisa, published by Boxtree, in London 1992

- The Complete James Bond Encyclopedia by Steven Jay Ruben published by Contemporary Books 1995

- The Authorized Guide to the World of 007 by Dave Worrall and Lee Pfeiffer published by Boxtree, London, 1998

- James Bond - The Legacy by John Cork and Bruce Scivally published by Boxtree 2002

- The Man with the Golden Typewriter by Fergus Fleming

- Small Arms of the World by H.B.Smith published by Military Service Publishing, 1943.

- No Second Place Winner by Bill Jordan published 1965

- Handguns of the World - Military Revolvers and Self-Loaders from 1870 to 1945 by Edward C. Ezell published by Marbaro Books 1991 ISBN 0-880029-618-6 first published 1981 by Stackpole Books

- Cartridges of the World by Frank C. Barnes 3rd Edition published by DBI Books, 1976, first published 1965

- Handgunner (1985) Number 28 'Armourer to 007' by Geoffrey Boothroyd

 

 

+ MAPS

 

 

 

-

 

Thunderball (1961) Wikipedia - Thunderball
 
Dr No (1962) Wikipedia - Dr No

 

 

Table of Contents Locations - Fiction Locations - World War II Locations - Rennsport - Motorsport Technical Subjects New Material Added Bibliography Karte - Maps Index and Links

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