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Association de Malfaiteurs (1987) Wikipedia - Association de Malfaiteurs Wikipedia - Association de Malfaiteurs Link - Association de Malfaiteurs  (1987)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981) Lobby Card

 

 

 

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)
Jeep Grand Cherokee Wikipedia - . An unusual sight on French roads or any European roads

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)
French police radar transmitters - continuous emissions

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This is the classic French speedtrap which was used from the invention of portable radar sets around 1975 until the 1990s. The radar was continuous emission, which meant it was easy to detect. One cop would wait in his car operating the radar set. They would chose small run-offs at the side of the autoroute, preferably behind a large sign which would conceal the car. Drivers became adept at spotting the car operating the radar set. The cop would read the speed off the read-out and would do his best to make a note of the first three digits of the registration. In reality he would usually get this and the make and color of the automobile. Sometimes not. He would then radio the cops up the road. They would wait in another cut out or at a service station. French police cars were just ordinary family saloon cars or vans so they used to use motorcycles to chase the speeding car. The motorcycles were not fast by motorcycle standard but were faster than their automobiles. The motorcycle would have to wait until the speeding vehicle went past it and give chase or if circumstance permitted, leave its station and move at cruising speed waiting for the automobile to go past. The preferred method was to mount the radar trap a couple of km before one of the large peage, which block the autoroute at the approach to large cities. Individual policemen on foot would then wait at the peage, usually behind the actual barrier and wait for the car to arrive. With only one policemen it would be difficult to catch the car because the peage is wide and drivers leaned to spot the cop and swing wide to the other side of the peage, pay the toll in cash (exact amount) and accelerate away with the cop running toward you gesticulating wildly in the hope that you will stop. You can sometimes see cops hanging around here waiting to check the tachographs on trucks. Fining foreign drivers was seen as a source of foreign exchange by French cops and foreigners were an easy touch compared to French citizens, who as groups, such as truck drivers, farmers, and even driving instructors were prone to direct action if they were upset by somebody. French cops would hang around the last peage before the border in the hope of catching foreign truckers who had driven across France non-stop in the hope of making it home in good time. Speed traps were set to catch German and English drivers who would be traveling long distance at high speeds.

French law provided a scale of fines depending on the speed. After a certain speed (it was around 200kh/h (120mph) ) they confiscated your driving license, as well. Your co-driver took over. No co-driver, no driving. At some point above 200km/h you were charged with the equivalent of reckless endangerment of life and jailed. The good news was that the French system was not that good at catching speeding drivers even when there was a speed trap.

The French system could not catch fast cars because there was no way that the motorcycle could catch up to the sports car. The second flaw in the system was that the cops stopped work around 17:00HRS, or as darkness fell. The speed traps did not operate at night. This was useful because you could cross France in the dark at your top speed.

I know of two Ferraris who escaped because a third Ferrari with them had to stop for gasoline and having stopped, sped after them only to find a motorcycle in their way who refused to pull over. It transpired that he was chasing the other two Ferraris in the hope that they would meet some obstruction further up the road or slow down for some reason.

In some other (more populous) countries an escaping car traveling that those kind of speeds would find itself the subject of a radio alert which traveled across all adjoining areas, but France is sparsely populated in comparison to the low countries and southern England. By way of compensation, the peage (toll both) system on French autoroutes gave the cops some kind of way of getting a cop car down there to intercept the speeding car. Even this was not easy because of the volume of traffic driving at the toll booths.

Obviously, some places became favorite among French police for mounting speed traps if they created easy conditions. The Autoroute A7 Wikipedia - as it approach south of Dijon Wikipedia - heading north would split to the left to head for Paris, taking English traffic or after 1980, split to the right taking German traffic home. This section to the right of Dijon became "radar alley" as French cops tried to catch German traffic heading home from the Riviera with hours of driving ahead of them.

French radar did not operate at night which meant that traffic from northern Europe heading for the Riviera could maintain top speed through the darkness. Fast cars occupying the outside lane would keep their outside indicator on continuously to give middle-lane weavers ahead of them time to pull over to let them through without them having to lift-off. If you were driving a truck the fast cars would flash past you in the darkness, en route for some unknown hotel or villa on the Riviera, with the indicator light looking like an aircraft strobe in the night.

The native French are not only poor drivers but are also reckless and reluctant to obey traffic regulations (such as the solid white line in the middle of the road which means "no overtaking".

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)
The unit in the French police car

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)
The French cop radios to the chase motorcycle further ahead.

 

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)
There he is. The chase motorcycle

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)
Ferrari Testarossa Wikipedia - license plate 806 FYM 75 - The code 75 is one of the Paris codes.

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)
Veglia Wikipedia - electronic speedometer. The mechanical speedometers were better.

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)
A respectable 307km/h (180mph).

 

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)
Les Flics Wikipedia - wait at the Peage. French police cars were ordinary saloons cars and very slow. Their police motorcycles were not much faster. It was convenient for their to station copes at the Peage.

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

Association de Malfaiteurs (1981)

 

 

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+ SEE ALSO

+ Links for use in Paris

+ Les Ripoux (1984) Wikipedia - Les RipouxWikipedia - Le Cop Link - Les Ripoux

 

+ EXTERNAL LINKS

 

 

+ BIBLIOGRAPHY

 

+ MAPS

+ French Autoroutes in 1980

 

 

 

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